How 10 Food Trends for 2016 Will Transform Restaurants

November 2, 2015

2015 Forbes.com LLC™ All Rights Reserved
http://www.forbes.com/sites/darrentristano/2015/10/28/how-10-food-trends-for-2016-will-transform-restaurants/

At this point a couple years ago, if you asked a restaurant executive how she might user Uber to build sales, she might have guessed as a prefix for the name of her brand’s Oktoberfest-theme burger. But now, Uber and Postmates are just two of the sharing-economy apps rapidly transforming foodservice and shaking up consumers’ expectations everywhere.
Going into 2016, there are dozens of similar forces shifting the ground beneath restaurants, and most of them are far beyond what brands have the power to control. While they are hard to predict, even for a data-rich firm like Technomic, they are easy to identify and understand, because they all spring from evolving consumer demand. Major moves from the biggest restaurant companies—McDonald’s moving its food supply toward more cage-free eggs, for example—aren’t dictated solely by the bottom line. They’re dictated by what consumers need from foodservice brands.

Technomic just released its 10 major food trends for 2016 with this dynamic in mind. Because consumers are the impetus behind all the upheaval, take a look at each trend and see how many of them you’re driving with your own dining out preferences.

The Sriracha Effect: This hot sauce from Thailand will continue to grow in popularity, but the “effect” Technomic predicts is that chefs and chain restaurant executives will search for the next hot ethnic flavor to find lightning in a bottle again. Early indications are that this will drive more use of and consumer interest in ghost pepper from India, sambal from Southeast Asia, gochujang from Korea, and harissa, sumac and dukka from North Africa.

The Delivery Revolution: Popular apps that simplify online and mobile ordering making “dining in” even easier and, in some cases, “dining out” irrelevant. Delivery services like GrubHub are starting to proliferate far beyond urban centers, bringing the convenience of a restaurant meal home, where plenty of people are likely camping out in front of the TV to binge-watch a season or two on Netflix. Other services are muscling in, including the aforementioned Uber and Amazon, which is expanding its Prime Fresh memberships for grocery delivery.

One particular threat to restaurants could be app-only services like Munchery, which delivers restaurant-quality food from a commissary, cutting out brick-and-mortar restaurants completely.

Negative on GMOs: In some cases, consumers have made up their minds before scientists have reached consensus, but many restaurant customers are declaring genetically modified organisms to be nonstarters. Many diners will agree with calls for labels of GMOs on menus and food packaging; some will go further and gravitate toward restaurants that advertise a GMO-free menu. That will be a major issue for the nation’s food supply, since many crops—particularly soy fed to livestock and other animal feeds—have been modified to boost their yields and productivity.

Modernizing the Supply Chain: Speaking of the supply chain, it already has enough challenges to deal with, including climate destabilization, rising costs for transportation and shipping, and pests. These will cause frequent repeats of shortages similar to those witnessed in 2015, like the unseasonable freeze that decimated Florida’s orange crop or the egg shortage that resulted from avian flu. Those hurdles will proliferate while more and more consumers demand food that is “fresh,” “local,” or just free of additives and artificial ingredients. Every brand, from restaurants to grocery stores and convenience stores, will make big investments in supply chain management in 2016.

Year of the Worker: Restaurants will also contend with rising labor costs, because of new mandates to cover full-time staff with health insurance and because the minimum wage could increase sharply depending on the state or city where they’re located. Pressure groups will ratchet up their call for a $15-per-hour wage, and they could possibly succeed in more cities like they have in New York and Seattle. Don’t expect any changes to the federal wage floor of $7.25 per hour, because no cooperation between a Democratic White House and a Republican Congress is possible, especially in an election year.
How will restaurants respond? Most will raise their wages to either comply with a new law or to compete for the best staff—but that means menu prices are going up as well, everywhere from fast food to fine dining. Also, more brands will experiment with technology and automation in the kitchens and the dining rooms to do more with fewer employees.

Fast Food Refresh: Consumers gravitate to “better” quick-service restaurants, which has transformed the industry. That has created a subset of “QSR-Plus” concepts with fresher menus and more contemporary designs, which exploits a price threshold between fast food and fast casual. Culver’s, Chick-fil-A and In-N-Out Burger are examples of this. “Build-your-own” menus are springing up across the industry, and many quick-service brands are adding amenities like alcohol.
QSR-Plus also helps other restaurants clarify their positioning by giving up their attempt to go upscale in a piecemeal approach, and those chains instead are returning to their roots with simplified menus and lower prices.

Elevating Peasant Fare: The popularity of street foods and consumers’ demand for portability and affordability have put things like meatballs, sausages and even breads back in the spotlight. But this time, those meatballs might have a nouveau twist, such as a blend of fancier meats like duck or lamb. Multiethnic dumplings will also continue to grow in popularity, from Eastern European pierogi to Asian bao.

Trash to Treasure: Rising prices for proteins will raise the profile of underused cuts of meat, organ meats or “trash fish.” The “use it all” mindset has also moved beyond the center of the plate. Some restaurants will use carrot pulp from the juicer to make a veggie burger patty, and perhaps other chains will follow the lead of Sweetgreen, which last year partnered with celebrity chef Dan Barber to make the wastED Salad, an entrée that saves vegetable scraps like broccoli stalks and cabbage cores and combines them with upscale ingredients like shaved Parmesan and pesto vinaigrette.

Let them eat kale stems!

Burned: Smoke and fire are showing up everywhere on the menu—smoky is the new spicy. Look for more charred- or roasted-vegetable sides, desserts with charred fruits or burnt-sugar toppings, or cocktails featuring smoked salt, smoked ice or smoky syrups.

Bubbly: Effervescence makes light work of the trendiest beverages. Technomic expects rapid sales growth of Champagnes and Proseccos, Campari-and-soda aperitifs, and adults-only “hard” soft drinks like ginger ales and root beers. In the nonalcoholic space, sales will also increase for fruit-based artisanal soda and sparkling teas.


Restaurant Doesn’t Deliver? New Uber-Like Services Will

August 17, 2015

2015-08-17_1057Kyle Arnold, Staff Writer
Copyright 2015, Orlando Sentinel Communications. All Rights Reserved.

http://www.orlandosentinel.com/business/os-restaurant-delivery-20150812-story.html 

The race is on to be Uber for restaurants.

Following the success of ride-sharing businesses, a handful of companies are pushing into Central Florida as on-call food-delivery services for restaurants that don’t have their own drivers.

Groupon-owned OrderUp launched Tuesday in Orlando with a fleet of about 60 drivers bringing food from restaurants to homes and businesses. Two local companies, Doorstep Delivery and Munchem, are also trying to find their place amid growing national competition from app-based services.

The services use an independent-contractor model, dispatching drivers to pick up orders at restaurants and then drive the food to its destination.

“You’ve always had the takeout-taxi model, but what we are seeing now is the younger generation who is very mobile-device-enabled,” said Darren Tristano, executive vice president of restaurant-research group Technomic.

The industry is more crowded nationally, with companies such as Postmates, GrubHub and Uber’s own restaurant delivery service, none of which has launched in Orlando.

Restaurants have been eager to get in on the trend, hoping to expand into delivery without hiring drivers. Chipotle, Olive Garden and Publix’s deli-sandwich counters are experimenting with the services at select locations locally.

Customers use the delivery services’ apps to place food orders, which are relayed to restaurants. The delivery service then picks up the completed orders and delivers them.

Third-party delivery services usually cost $4 to $6 per order, and customers are expected to tip the drivers. The delivery service often takes a cut of the total bill from restaurants, too.

Doorstep has about 300 partners in Central Florida, while OrderUp started with 31 partner restaurants. Munchem takes orders for any restaurant in which it can find a menu.

“These days everybody expects on-demand service,” said Andrew Brown, co-founder of Orlando-headquartered Doorstep Delivery. “People expect what they want, and they want it brought to them.”

Doorstep Delivery is the oldest of such local third-party restaurant delivery companies. It started in the Orlando area seven years ago without smartphones or an app, using dispatchers taking orders on a notepad and calling them into restaurants.

Brown said the rapid pace of technology has pushed the company to redevelop its model, leaning heavier on Web and mobile ordering. Doorstep is revamping its app to allow real-time tracking of delivery drivers, a feature popular with other services.

It is in 19 markets, mostly in Florida but also places such as Charlotte, N.C.; Dallas; and Denver. Nationwide, it has about 600 drivers and about 60 locally.

Gator’s Dockside has been working with Doorstep Delivery for about five years. It had considered its own delivery drivers but decided to go with a third-party company.

“When you figure 150 orders a month per location is probably average, I would say it’s definitely worth it as a business to try to reach those people,” said Gator’s Dockside director of operations Joe Foranoce.

OrderUp says its drivers can make up to $25 an hour during peak periods. The company, as well as others, does background checks on drivers and issues them a car magnet and “hot and cool” bags to keep food at temperature.

Delivery times aren’t guaranteed, since restaurants prepare food at their own pace. But the services are designed to have drivers arrive at the restaurant as soon as food is ready and hit the road.

Moises Almaraz, 20, took OrderUp’s first delivery Tuesday from Church Street Tavern in downtown Orlando to a nearby office building.

“I hope to make about $20 an hour,” said Almaraz, who recently moved from Naples after earning his associate degree and hopes to enroll at the University of Central Florida. “I’m just looking to earn some extra money before I go back to school.”

The independent-contractor model has been used by ride-hailing companies Uber and Lyft, requiring drivers to pay for their own gas, maintenance and taxes.

Another Orlando-based service, Munchem, launched to customers earlier this year with an app.

The service started in the Dr. Phillips neighborhood and has expanded to downtown and the UCF area. Munchem has seven drivers and is hiring more.

“We’ll deliver from pretty much any restaurant that we can get a menu for,” said Andy Kordalski, a spokesman for Munchem. “The ones that want to work with us are great, but we don’t necessarily need to partner with them because we’ll make the order and pick up the food ourselves.”