Charcuterie, the Meats of the Moment

March 20, 2015

Eric Snider
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Charcuterie, generally served cold, is hot — and getting hotter.

What was centuries ago a means to preserve the entire pig, and thus waste none of it, has evolved into a de rigueur item on the menus of fine dining establishments.

A bevy of restaurants and wine bars in Tampa Bay feature boards of exotic cured and processed meats. They’re often accompanied by cheeses, vegetables — roasted, grilled, pickled — and artisan breads.

At least three top-tier eateries in Tampa have taken charcuterie to the next level by making their own sausages, bolognas, headcheeses, galantines, pates, terrines, pancettas, et al.

The recently opened Haven, which replaced SideBern’s in South Tampa, not only produces its own meats but has made the charcuterie/cheese slicing station a focal point of its dining room. “We’re selling the heck out of it,” said Executive Chef Chad Johnson.

Ava, the rustic Italian place that opened in November just up Howard Avenue from the Bern’s cluster, doles out 30-40 boards of salumi (the Italian equivalent) on weekend nights, said Executive Chef Joshua Hernandez.

Mise en Place moved a lot of charcuterie in the ’80s, then saw it get eclipsed by other trends. “We probably went through a period where we had like two pates,” said Co-owner Maryann Ferenc. About five years ago, Chef Marty Blitz started producing his own meats.

Now Mise en Place is back to offering a full array, Ferenc said, adding, “It’s been about two years since we haven’t had to push it. People ask about it, are naturally gravitating toward it.”

Here to stay?

The charcuterie movement looks to be a more durable trend than a passing fad, say advocates. It fits in with the relatively new dining custom that skews toward shared plates and communal eating.

“I’ve seen four-tops of [women] on their way to the bars on South Howard order the meat board and destroy it,” Hernandez said.

At first glance, gobbling platters of fat-laden meat would seem to run counter to healthy eating. But charcuterie by nature is consumed in small portions, which earns it marks for moderation. It also gets cred for sustainability — using parts of animals that are often discarded.

Also: “The diner who comes in the door of a restaurant with a charcuterie station gets a bit of theater and a visual cue that says ‘freshness,’ which is in high demand,” said Darren Tristano, executive vice president of Technomic, a Chicago-based food industry research firm.

Shared meat boards are enjoying their moment, he says, because “the basic consumer equation, post-recession, has changed from price first to freshness, artisanal values and craftsmanship.”

Passionate practitioners

Producing charcuterie sparks deep passion among its practitioners. As a part of Ava’s rollout charcuterie program, Hernandez served prosciutto that he purchased. That’s because hams take longest to produce — in the two-year range. Once his own, less time-intensive, meats were ready, he dropped the Italian ham so his salumi would be “100 percent house-made.”

“I’ve got a few hams in my chamber,” Hernandez said. “They should be ready in about another year and a half.”

For now, he’s concocting items like red wine and black pepper salami, cinnamon salami, pancetta (cured pork belly) and coppa (cured pork shoulder).

On a recent Friday, Haven’s chef de cuisine, Courtney Orwig, was butchering Wagyu eye-round beef into loins that would turn into Bresaola after about a nine-day process that involved salting and air-drying. Outside, future duck summer sausage was arrayed in a smoker.

It’s these kinds of culinary efforts and quality ingredients that separate today’s fine-dining charcuterie from cellophane-wrapped summer sausage at the mall and suspect mystery meats in the deli cooler.

Tristano, the food-industry analyst, says the restaurant charcuterie boom probably drafted off of consumer interest at food stores.

“As supermarkets got more sophisticated in their offerings and specialty markets gained a foothold in markets like Tampa Bay, people came in to buy the exotic meats and cheeses and wines,” he said. “I think the supermarket demand fueled the restaurants.”

He expects diners to see more and more charcuterie boards. “The trend is moving into smaller markets with less of a foodie reputation,” he said, “and also beyond just high-end restaurants and into places with lower price points.”


Luxury Dining at the Mall

April 22, 2014

bildeWhen the new Saks Fifth Avenue department store opens at the Mall at University Town Center, shoppers can expect more than just expanded departments and two floors of merchandise. The 80,000- square-foot Saks space — one of the key anchors for the $315 million mall in Sarasota County — also will boast its own restaurant, and be one of the first in the chain to do so.

When Saks opens, so will “Sophie’s,” a new restaurant concept by Fifth Dining LLC, a new restaurant effort within the Saks brand. The elegant, gourmet restaurant will complement the department store’s look and feel but will offer a completely separate lunch and dinner dining experience for Saks shoppers.

“We wanted to tie together the legacy of Saks with a concept that had a lot of appeal for the people who happen to shop here,” said Michael Kaufman, president of Fifth Dining. “The restaurant is designed to be a high-end experience through a unique look and feel and our freshly prepared food. It’s not stuffy, but resonates appropriately with the traditional Saks Fifth Avenue shopper.”

The 2,600-square-foot restaurant’s design is simple, with sleek tables and chairs and black-and-white finishes.

Its name pays homage to one of Saks Fifth Avenue’s legendary fashion designers, Sophie Gimbel, who designed women’s apparel for Saks for 40 years and married a Saks executive. Among her many simple and elegant designs was a red coat and dress she created for Lady Bird Johnson.

“We’re not creating a museum to honor Sophie, but a restaurant brand, if you will, keeping in mind what she stood for — like the simplicity in the way she designed — as we go along,” Kaufman said.

IT STARTED IN CHICAGO

Saks opened its first Sophie’s concept in Chicago earlier this year. Sarasota will be the second. More restaurants are planned in larger markets.

“These kind of restaurants primarily target women. It’s very much a place for ladies to lunch and meet their friends, then continue shopping,” said Jeff Green, a retail analyst with Phoenix-based Jeff Green Partners. “The demographic in Nordstrom cafes is traditionally older. I imagine the restaurant in Saks will do very well in Sarasota.”

Saks Fifth Avenue will close its existing 40,000-square-foot store at the Westfield Southgate Mall in October, when the mall being jointly developed by Taubman Centers and Benderson Development debuts.

Saks Fifth Avenue has further invested in the importance of the Southwest Florida market by closing its Tampa store at Westshore Mall.

When the 880,000-square-foot Mall at University Town Center opens in October, Sarasota will have the only Saks department store on the Gulf Coast north of Fort Myers.

Saks joins Macy’s and Dillard’s as anchors for the new mall, the only enclosed mall scheduled to open this year in the United States.

A slew of other national, high-end retailers have committed to opening stores there, including Apple, Anthropologie, lululemon, Tiffany’s & Co. and Brooks Brothers, to name a few.

Sophie’s will compete with other national restaurant chains — Brio Tuscan Grille, Capital Grill, Seasons 52, Cheesecake Factory and Zinburger — as dining options at the new mall.

“There are so many great restaurants in Sarasota. We hope Sophie’s will fit right in,” Kaufman said.

The restaurant will not stay open later than the department store does. Each Sophie’s will have a menu unique to its market. For example, Sarasota’s menu will have more fresh seafood than others, Kaufman said.

While the Sarasota Sophie’s menu has yet to be created, and the Chicago restaurant is open only for breakfast and lunch, its menu gives a taste of what Sarasota can expect. It includes a $12 cocktail menu with a rhubarb basil gimlet of distillery gin, basil, bitters and lime juice. Entrees include a North Atlantic salmon for $25 and an “Amish chicken breast” for $21.

A RETAILING TREND

Saks Fifth Avenue is the latest upscale retailer to venture into the dining sector in recent years.

Nordstrom’s department stores, including the one in Tampa’s International Plaza, have their own line of in-store cafes, which serve lighter fare, coffee and cocktails.

The concept has helped make Nordstrom more of a destination for shoppers, said Darren Tristano, executive vice president with Chicago-based Technomic, a food consulting firm.

“Combining a high-end restaurant with the Saks or Nordstrom clientele is a service to the customer that goes beyond just the typical shopping experience,” he said. “The idea of restaurants in department stores is coming back, and we’re seeing a lot of it internationally. It has great strength and is moving forward.”

Macy’s, too, has dabbled with restaurant concepts in larger markets — such as its Stella 34 Trattoria, an Italian restaurant tucked onto the sixth floor of the Macy’s in New York.

Brooks Brothers announced that it plans to open its first restaurant, “Makers and Merchants,” a steakhouse, around the corner from its flagship store in New York this year. The restaurant is taking over vacant space once used for a Brooks Brothers women’s line.

“Price is not the issue here, considering the type of store shoppers are in,” said Green, the Phoenix-based consultant. “We really only see these kind of restaurants inside upscale department stores, even though they used to be in more traditional stores.

“Full-service restaurants won’t ever be in traditional stores anymore.”


Income Influences Patronage and Attitudes

October 18, 2012

High-income consumers not only use foodservice more often than lower-income consumers do, they also have a different set of demands.

Consumers’ household income—particularly as it relates to their disposable income—strongly impacts many areas of their life, including where they live, where and how they shop, their daily priorities and intrinsic motivations—essentially their overall lifestyle.

Wealth also influences how and why consumers use foodservice. High-income consumers are about twice as likely as lower-income consumers to use foodservice at least once a week, making them an important demographic for the industry. However, it would be remiss to not examine patronage and purchasing decisions among middle- and lower-income groups to determine how to build incremental sales with these consumers as well.

Technomic’s recent Influence of Income Consumer Trend Report polled consumers of all stripes, then broke them down into Working, Lower-Middle, Upper-Middle and Affluent income groups.

  • Working—Generally consumers who earn an annual household income of $34,999 or less. Those earning up to $44,999 were also included in this group if their household size was larger than two individuals. Those in high-cost areas such as major cities were also included in this group if they earned up to $54,999 and had an even larger household size of three or more individuals.
  • Lower Middle—Consumers who report an annual household income of roughly $45,000 to $74,999. Consumers with even lower income ranges, such as those earning $35,000–$44,999, were included in this group if they lived in a low cost-of-living area or if their households included just themselves or one other individual.
  • Upper Middle—Generally consumers who earn $85,000–$104,999 annually. Those in smaller households, or in lower cost of living areas such as rural, suburban or small city areas, were included in this group as long as they reported an income of at least $65,000–$84,999.
  • Affluent—Generally consumers who report an annual household income of roughly $125,000 or more. Consumers who live by themselves and earn $105,000–$124,999 were also included in this group, while households in this income bracket but with a larger household size or in higher cost of living areas fell into the Upper-Middle income group.

Foodservice Patronage

Affluence is tied to greater foodservice usage; nearly twice as many Affluent consumers as those in the Working group use foodservice more than once a week. Wealthier consumers also source a greater portion of their meals away from home than lower-income consumers, with the greatest gap at lunch. On average, more than two-fifths of Affluent consumers’ lunches, compared to just a third of Working consumers’ lunches, are purchased at restaurants.

Base: 2,000 consumers aged 18+
Source: The Influence of Income Consumer Trend Report

The fact that away from home lunch purchases vary so widely based on consumers’ level of affluence speaks to the importance consumers place on convenient foodservice options at lunch, and a preference to source lunch from restaurants regularly if they can afford to do so. Many lower-income consumers likely can’t afford to purchase food away from home for lunch as often as their higher-income counterparts, choosing to eat at home or bring meals from home more often. Operators may be able to increase incremental traffic and sales at lunch by varying their menus to offer options for consumers on a tight budget. This could be through options that provide greater value, such as combos, or items that are offered at absolute low price points, such as value meals. However, when doing so, operators will want to be sure that these items do not cause core customers to trade down from their usual, higher-priced offerings.

Takeout and delivery usage skews to lower-income consumers, while a significantly greater proportion of meals purchased by Affluent consumers are for dine-in. Consumers with a higher disposable income are also more likely to use technology such as a cell phones or smartphones to place their takeout and delivery orders.

Different Priorities

Low prices are the highest priority for Working and Lower-Middle income groups when choosing a limited-service restaurant for dine-in occasions, while Affluent consumers place greater importance on a convenient location. Low prices are also more important to lower-income groups than higher-income groups at full-service locations, as the chart illustrates.

Affluent consumers place a higher priority on convenience of location than any other income group, for both limited- and full-service restaurant occasions. This data suggests that lower-income consumers sometimes need to go out of their way for the low-cost items they seek, while higher-income consumers are willing and able to pay higher prices to visit a convenient location.

Base: 952 consumers aged 18+ who dine in at these locations
Source: The Influence of Income Consumer Trend Report

Consumers with different levels of affluence cope with time constraints in different ways; lower-income consumers are more willing to trade health for convenience, while higher-income consumers are more likely to multi-task during meals and eat on the go.

Slightly more Affluent than Working consumers say an appealing taste and the use of fresh ingredients are important for limited-service dine-in occasions, suggesting that, to some degree, lower-income consumers associate these qualities with higher prices. Lower-income consumers may assume to some extent that taste and freshness cost more, and as a result likely rate it lower because of their priority on low prices. Meanwhile, for full-service dine-in occasions, Affluent consumers emphasize taste and freshness, while lower-income consumers are more likely than higher-income consumers to place a high level of importance on menu variety.

Higher-income consumers are more likely to seek restaurant recommendations from friends and family; a third of Affluent consumers, compared to a fifth of Working consumers, say they often ask for such recommendations. Higher-income consumers are also significantly more likely than lower-income consumers to utilize computers and smartphones to research restaurant menus online. And twice as many Affluent than Working consumers say they often consult online review sites and blogs when choosing a restaurant.

Priorities do not always differ by income group. Two out of three consumers overall agree that order accuracy and food that tastes just as good as for dine-in are highly important for takeout and delivery occasions; the fact that there are few significant skews by income indicates that these are must-haves for takeout occasions regardless of consumers’ level of affluence.

A Change in Attitude

Just half of Affluent consumers, versus three-fifths of Working consumers, view eating out at full-service restaurants as a special treat. This indicates a significant difference between Affluent and Working consumers’ perceptions and motivations for dining at full-service restaurants. Working consumers have tighter budgets and do not visit full-service restaurants as frequently as Affluent consumers, which is likely why lower-income consumers view these occasions as special events.

Additionally, more than a quarter of Affluent consumers, compared to just a tenth of Working and Lower-Middle consumers, say they eat out at restaurants more frequently than they prepare food at home, confirming that Affluent consumers have a high reliance on and preference for restaurant meals.

Base: 898 (a special treat) and 934 (whenever I want to) consumers aged 18+; responses were randomly rotated
Respondents indicated their opinion on a scale of 1–6 where 6 = agree completely and 1 = disagree completely
Source: The Influence of Income Consumer Trend Report

Wealthy consumers also appear to use restaurants to a greater extent than lower-income consumers as a place to socialize. Seven out of 10 Upper-Middle income-group consumers, and just three-fifths of Working and Lower-Middle consumers, say restaurants are a great place to get together with friends.

Although few consumers actively follow restaurants through social media, those who do are most likely to be from Upper-Middle and Affluent households. Facebook, the leading social media site consumers use to connect with restaurants, appeals to consumers from all levels of wealth. However, Twitter and Groupon, in particular, are used regularly by Affluent consumers.

Two-fifths of Affluent consumers, compared to a quarter of Working consumers, say they prefer restaurants with new or innovative menus, suggesting that unique offerings may help attract higher-income consumers. Several ethnic cuisines, including Japanese, Spanish, Greek and Thai, are especially appealing to Affluent consumers.

Base: 914 (willing to try new foods) and 933 (new or innovative flavors) consumers aged 18+; responses were randomly rotated
Respondents indicated their opinion on a scale of 1–6 where 6 = agree completely and 1 = disagree completely
Source: The Influence of Income Consumer Trend Report

Key Takeaways

Consumers’ level of affluence strongly impacts when and how they use restaurants, and it would be easy to focus on these frequent diners. But while they are very important to the foodservice industry because of their high patronage, they account for just a small proportion of consumers. Therefore, it is important for operators to consider their lower-income customers as well.

Understanding the preferences of consumers at different income levels is key to developing strategies that meet the various needs of consumers, regardless of income.

Darren Tristano is Executive Vice President of Technomic Inc., a Chicago-based foodservice consultancy and research firm. Since 1993, he has led the development of Technomic’s Information Services division and directed multiple aspects of the firm’s operations. For more information, visit www.technomic.com.