McDonald’s All-Day Breakfast Sparks a Fast Food Fight

May 9, 2016

by Leslie Patton

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-05-03/mcdonald-s-breakfast-push-sets-off-morning-scramble-in-fast-food

Fast-food joints aren’t hitting the snooze button anymore.

McDonald’s Corp.’s decision to start selling Egg McMuffins all day long last year — meant to help sales during lunch and dinner time — has boosted its morning business as well. That, in turn, has kicked off a scramble among its rivals to find new ways to combine eggs, potatoes and meat for a tasty breakfast.

The latest example is Burger King’s Egg-Normous breakfast burrito, which is being introduced in the U.S. on Tuesday. It’s stuffed with sausage, bacon, eggs, hash browns, cheddar and American cheese and served with picante sauce. The home of the Whopper, which still serves breakfast only during morning hours, also recently added a supreme breakfast hoagie and got rid of slower-selling English muffin sandwiches.

“We’ve invested more in breakfast,” Alex Macedo, head of Burger King North America, said in an interview. “The environment is very competitive.”

Along with adding and deleting items, Burger King tweaked its smaller egg burrito earlier this year, removing green and red peppers and replacing them with hash browns.

Skillet Bowls

Taco Bell revised its morning offerings in March to include $1 options such as skillet bowls and sausage flatbread quesadillas. Subway Restaurants just announced buy-one-get-one subs for the month of May. The catch: They have to be purchased before 9 a.m. And Dunkin’ Donuts revamped its menu boards to focus on all-day choices and started advertising $1.99 Coolatta drinks that are sold at all hours.

The changes come as more U.S. consumers grab eggs and coffee outside the home, according to a study by researcher GfK MRI published by EMarketer.com. Last year, more than 34 percent of Americans reported buying breakfast at fast-food restaurants, an increase from 32.8 percent in 2011. Meanwhile, fewer consumers said they’re dining out for lunch and snacks. Dinner increased less than 1 percent.

McDonald’s all-day breakfast in the U.S. has helped turn around its worst sales slump in more than a decade by drawing more customers throughout the day, including the morning. The plan is surpassing its goals.

Exceeding Expectations

“It’s still exceeding our expectations,” Chief Executive Officer Steve Easterbrook said on a conference call in April. “Whilst we clearly added incremental visits and incremental spend across rest of day, our breakfast business has also prospered.”

Items like Egg McMuffins and hash browns fueled a 5.4 percent U.S. same-store sales increase at McDonald’s in the first quarter. That’s stronger than the most recent quarterly gains posted by Burger King, Dunkin’ and Taco Bell.

“It’s helped drive success, which they haven’t seen for several years,” said Darren Tristano, president of industry researcher Technomic Inc.

After losing customers to McDonald’s all-day Egg McMuffins, Jack in the Box Inc. has been advertising a triple-cheese and hash-brown breakfast burrito. Same-store sales at company-owned Jack in the Box locations may be down as much as 3 percent in the recently ended quarter, the company said in Februar-1x-1y. The chain also is adjusting and improving other breakfast items, CEO Lenny Comma said during a conference in March.

Dunkin’ Donuts said last month that its new menu boards are helping drive breakfast-sandwich sales. It’s also focused on introducing mobile ordering and will start a 1,650-store test in metro New York in May to get customers their morning meals even faster. CEO Nigel Travis says McDonald’s push has actually helped Dunkin’ in the breakfast battle by highlighting that the doughnut chain has the same menu all day. Still, the change has increased competition for diners’ dollars.

“Clearly, the value war is pretty intense,” Travis said in an interview.


10 Nuggets For $1.49? Here’s Why Fast Food Is Ridiculously Cheap Right Now

April 1, 2016

Venessa Wong
Buzzfeed News
Feb 29, 2016
http://www.buzzfeed.com/venessawong/why-fast-food-is-ridiculously-cheap-right-now#.gnYqPoN15

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The country’s largest fast food chains have been showering customers with deals after years of losing out to newer, higher-end chains. And now, in a battle for customers who remain loyal to old-school fast food, the big chains are engaged in a brutal price war.
Fast food companies have always targeted lower-income consumers. What’s different now is that these customers are expected to benefit from lower gas prices, falling unemployment, and rising minimum wages, according to research by investment bank Cowen and Company. And as low-income consumers find more money in their wallets, commodity prices are no longer shooting upward as they did in recent years.
As “forecasts for key restaurant commodities including beef, chicken, pork, dairy and wheat are in-line to below long term averages,” restaurants are particularly eager now to take advantage of the lower costs to boost traffic to stores, said Cowen’s report.
McDonald’s announced that starting Feb. 29, customers could pick two of four “iconic menu items” — a Big Mac, a 10-piece order of Chicken McNuggets, Filet-O-Fish or a Quarter Pounder with Cheese — for $5. This deal replaces the even lower-priced McPick 2 deal launched in January, in which customers could get two items — McChicken, McDouble, mozzarella sticks, or small french fries — for $2.
Meanwhile, Wendy’s has been offering a four for $4 deal. Value monger Burger King has an even cheaper five for $4 promotion, as well as an ongoing two for $5 sandwich deal, and 10 chicken nuggets for $1.49. Even Pizza Hut has a $5 “flavor menu.”
“All the major chains have jumped on the dollar pricing in an effort to maintain share against competitors,” said Darren Tristano, president at restaurant consultancy Technomic.


The remarkable rise of the sushi burrito

March 7, 2016

By Becky Krystal
The Washington Post
March 4th, 2016
https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/going-out-guide/wp/2016/03/04/the-remarkable-rise-of-the-sushi-burrito/

Korrito

Has your sushi been a bit different lately? Maybe longer, pudgier and rolled up with rice, protein and vegetables? You know, kind of like a burrito?

Actually, let’s call a spade a spade. Your sushi isn’t just like a burrito. At an increasing number of eateries, it is, in fact, a burrito. The sushi burrito has officially joined the ranks of such culinary chimeras as the Cronut and the ramen burger, seducing both eager customers and the restaurateurs who want to feed them.

Even as diners eat fewer Chipotle burritos, sushi burritos are gaining traction around the country and in the Washington area. The latest purveyor joined the D.C. scene last week: Seoulspice in NoMa, which sells what it calls the Korrito, a Korean-style burrito wrapped in seaweed and filled with sushi-grade rice, plus a variety of meats, vegetables and sauces.

Eric Shin, a percussionist for the National Symphony Orchestra, said he hit upon the burrito concept almost by accident about two years ago. He’d originally planned to offer kimbap, Korean rolls sliced into bite-sized pieces. Unfortunately — or perhaps fortunately — the machine he bought to cut them destroyed the food. “It was a huge mess,” he said. Amid the disappointment, Shin’s wife was so hungry she just picked up an uncut roll and started eating it like a burrito.

“It just sort of stuck,” Shin said.

Darren Tristano would tell you that the popularity of the sushi burrito is no accident. The president of Technomic, a Chicago-based firm that specializes in food industry analysis, said a number of factors are at play. Primary among them is the form itself. Four years ago, a Technomic concept study predicted “burrito-inspired” would be a common industry trend. Good call.

Sushi burritos have also been propelled by the growth in fast-casual dining and its build-your-own mentality, Tristano said. And with sushi available at almost every grocery store these days, it’s become an accessible and familiar food.

Like so many food innovations, sushi burritos gained traction on the West Coast and are continuing their march across the country. Sushirrito, a five-location California chain that bills itself as “the original sushi burrito concept” debuted in San Francisco in 2011, the same year the Jogasaki food truck hit the streets of Los Angeles; the Kome truck peddles sushi burritos in San Francisco.

“The concept for Sushirrito came to be since we love sushi and wanted it to be more accessible and portable. Burrito-sizing sushi makes a lot of sense given the handheld aspect of it,” said Sushirrito founder Peter Yen. “We weren’t trying to start a trend. We simply wanted to create a new type of food that we like to eat. Hybrid foods only make sense when the foods belong together — just because you can do a mash-up, doesn’t mean you should.”

Even given the wave of sushi burritos in California, lifelong friends and first-time restaurateurs Mike Haddad and Travis Elton weren’t quite sure what to expect when they debuted Buredo in downtown D.C. last summer.

[There’s no way we couldn’t try Buredo’s burrito-size sushi rolls]

“We didn’t know how it would be perceived,” Haddad said. When the doors opened and curious diners snaked down the block, “I said, ‘I think we have something here.'” Something big enough that the duo is close to opening a second location, near Dupont Circle.

Haddad and Elton think they’ve hit on customers’ interest in food that is fresh and healthful.

Darren Norris knows he’s tapped into that market at his almost year-old Maki Shop on 14th Street NW, where evenings will see diners trickling in from CrossFit and other nearby gyms. The owner of the late Kushi in Mount Vernon Triangle — whose six-ounce maki fall somewhere between the size of smaller sushi and sushi burritos — said his “sushi hand rolls” are “a lifestlye product” for on-the-go diners. “I want to be that thing that you could eat three days a week and not feel guilty about it,” Norris said.

Kaz Okochi, the proprietor of Kaz Sushi Bistro near Foggy Bottom, said he thinks size is what attracts people to sushi burritos — “too much rice,” he opined — and worries that diners who eat them will come to his restaurant and wonder why his food isn’t bigger. “They might get disappointed,” the Japanese native said. (Okochi’s own fast-casual, design-your-own sushi endeavor, Oh Fish!, lasted about two years downtown.)

Their size and torpedo shape notwithstanding, sushi burritos have forced us to reconsider what we think of as sushi, especially when it comes to fillings. At Buredo, nori is wrapped around everything from yellowfin tuna or salmon sashimi to tofu and pulled pork shoulder. Seoulspice’s Korean-accented items include bulgogi beef, pickled radish and, of course, kimchi. At Burrito San in Miami, you can have your sushi burrito by way of the Philippines (braised pork, banana ketchup) or India (spiced chicken, potatoes, curry). Denver’s Komotodo not only sells rolls such as the Bee’s Knees (fried chicken, asparagus, bacon, Monterey Jack cheese) and Fish n’ Chips (white fish, slaw, potato chips), but also gives you the $2 option to have your burrito deep-fried. Really, the question these days is not what can you put in a sushi burrito, but what can’t you?

Okochi, though, doesn’t take umbrage with the burrito entrepreneurs’ use of the word “sushi.”

“I’m not saying burrito sushi isn’t true sushi. Sushi is vinegared rice,” he said. Sticklers could even contest whether Okochi’s food is “true” sushi, since the chef said he’s developed his own style at his restaurant.

As long as sushi burritos don’t take over the entire sushi market, he’s fine living side-by-side with them, he said.

In fact, self-professed sushi lovers Haddad and Elton view themselves as “introducing sushi to a new audience,” Elton said.

“It is definitely opening up people’s minds,” Haddad said.

Seoulspice’s Shin said he’d like his Korritos to similarly encourage diners to seek out the kind of traditional Korean food he grew up eating.

Even with more people like Haddad, Elton and Shin getting in on the sushi burrito game, Technomic’s Tristano said there’s still room to grow in the genre. He said reasons why sushi burrito establishments are still less common than their popularity might indicate include food safety issues with sourcing and serving raw fish (although many burritos rely on cooked, fried or even vegetarian fillings) and the fact that the concept is hard to replicate.

“A good sushi burrito can be tricky and sometimes challenging to get the flavors to blend together well in a larger roll,” said Mauricio Fraga-Rosenfeld of Rolls by U in Arlington, which opened in the fall with sushi “ritos” such as the Frida (with roast beef and kimchi) and the Van Gogh (a more traditional pairing of tuna and avocado). “Also, price point may play a part in why others don’t want to risk it. It’s cheaper to do tacos or Mexican burritos. It takes creativity and great quality in product and recipe to get it right, as well as extremely fresh ingredients.”

“I think it’s really difficult to pull off,” Shin said. “Most of the restaurants that open up are afraid to do something different.” Shin said he had to battle through questions and skepticism from his own family (his parents ran a Korean restaurant in Atlanta), some of whose recipes he’s using at Seoulspice. “I caught a lot of s— from my grandma,” he laughed.

When other sushi burrito spots do inevitably open, Shin won’t be too worried. “The more, the merrier,” he said. “I’m so proud of D.C. for embracing ethnic foods and creative ethnic foods in general.”

The Buredo duo was slightly more measured.

“Time,” Haddad said, “will tell on who will last.”

Correction: A previous version of this story misidentified the geographical origins of Jogasaki and the Kome truck. This version has been updated.


Yum! Brands keeping headquarters in Louisville, moving executives to Texas

March 1, 2016

Caitlin Bowling
INsider Louisville
February 24, 2016
http://insiderlouisville.com/business/yum-headquarters-louisville-moving-heads/

With Yum! Brands Inc. relocating five key C-suite executives to Plano, Texas, Louisville may become a show headquarters for the restaurant conglomerate, while employees in Texas are the ones actually steering the ship.

Yum Brands Inc. is headquartered at 1900 Colonel Sanders Lane. | Courtesy of Yum! Brands

Yum Brands Inc. is headquartered at 1900 Colonel Sanders Lane. | Courtesy of Yum! Brands

“Whenever you move your C-level team … in effect you are moving your headquarters because that is where your heads are,” said Darren Tristano, president at Technomic, a Chicago-based restaurant industry research firm.

Business First previously reported that Yum CEO Greg Creed, chief public affairs and global nutrition officer Jonathan Blum, chief legal officer Marc Kesselman, chief people officer Tracy Skeans, and a yet-to-be-named CFO will move to Plano, where Yum’s global operations team and its subsidiary Pizza Hut are located.

Yum’s former CFO Pat Grismer resigned effective Feb. 19, Insider Louisville previously reported.

The company is adamant that Louisville is and will remain Yum’s home. Virginia Ferguson, a spokeswoman for Yum, told IL that none of its nearly 1,000 Yum and KFC U.S. employees are moving to Texas.

“We are proud to be here,” Ferguson said.

IL was scheduled to interview Blum this afternoon about the impending move; however, a few minutes before the appointment, IL was told he was suddenly pulled away and would be unavailable for comment. Ferguson forwarded along statements from Yum explaining the decision.

Creed and the other four executives “will be highly mobile, traveling to many of our international markets and offices throughout the year, including Louisville for 1-2 weeks each month,” Ferguson said in an emailed statement. “Given the global nature of our business, which has transformed over the years, the YUM executive team’s office will be in Plano, but they will retain an office in Louisville.”

She also noted that Yum has based its international operations in Texas since 1997, when the company spun-off from PepsiCo.

It makes sense that the company’s leaders would want to be close to its overseas operations, Tristano said. “Today, a lot of the growth restaurant companies are seeing takes place outside our borders.”

Texas also is home to a number of other restaurant chains and restaurant-related businesses, including Pie Five Pizza, Dickey’s Barbecue Pit, Romano’s Macaroni Grill and Apex Restaurant Group.

“Dallas is considered a very big restaurant town,” Tristano said, noting that many industry events and restaurant innovation happens there. It also is warm, has a large population and is somewhat centrally located.

While Louisville city leaders often tout the city’s location and its proximity to other places, the truth is one of the few ways to get a direct flight is to be a box the United Parcel Service is shipping.

The Louisville International Airport has fewer than 20 nonstop flights to cities in the United States. The Dallas/Fort Worth International Airport is a major transportation hub; it has nearly 50 nonstop flights to international cities and countless more within the continental United States.

“There is no way to overlook that,” said Nat Irvin, the Strickler executive in residence and professor of management at the University of Louisville College of Business. “We can get to the airport in 20 minutes from any place in the city, but part of the downside is you can’t get to any place directly.”

And Dallas is closer to China — where Yum will spin-off its operations this year — offering a nonstop flight to Beijing. Although Yum China will technically operate as its own company, Yum leaders will no doubt be keeping a close eye on how the company is faring in China’s sometimes volatile market.

Already, Yum executives spend a good portion of their year abroad, according to the company.

“I think what (the move) represents is the importance of face-to-face communications when you are developing strategy,” Irvin said. “You like to see them; you like to hear them; you like to be close to them.”

The only factor in Yum’s decision, according to Ferguson, was the fact that the company’s global operations offices are in Texas

“Our business is a global business, and it makes sense,” she said.

Tristano said he wouldn’t be surprised if Yum moved more jobs to Texas in the future, but the company also has good reason to remain in Louisville. If the company said it planned to move its headquarters but keep jobs in Louisville, it could end up with a retention problem.

“It would make sense for them to continue to have that (Louisville) location regardless of what they call it,” he said. “This is a less disruptive strategy for them.”

With its name plastered around the city (see KFC Yum! Center), Irvin said he is confident Yum will continue to maintain a large presence in Louisville.

“I think Yum is fully ensconced in this community. The company has a very broad footprint in this community, and I think the heart still remains right there,” Irvin said. “I think what they have made is a decision for the company. I don’t think it’s a detriment to the community — a good idea for them, not necessarily a bad idea for us.”

Still, the decision by Yum is an unusual one.

Tristano could not think of any comparable examples, except possibly Tim Horton’s and Burger King. However, the quandary over where to headquarter those two restaurant chains is the result of their merger back in 2014. As of now, Tim Horton’s base of operations remains in Canada, while Burger King resides in the United States.

Overall, Tristano said he thinks Yum is making good decisions to focus more globally and try to appeal to younger generations.

“They seem to be moving in the right direction strategically.”


Snacks are having a moment and food makers cashing in

February 26, 2016

Samantha Bomkamp
Chicago Tribune
February 22, 2016
http://www.chicagotribune.com/business/ct-snacking-boom-0223-biz-20160219-story.html

The market for snacks, sold at Walgreens and other retailers, is growing rapidly, analysts say, and manufacturers are working to cash in on the popularity. (E. Jason Wambsgans / Chicago Tribune)

The market for snacks, sold at Walgreens and other retailers, is growing rapidly, analysts say, and manufacturers are working to cash in on the popularity. (E. Jason Wambsgans / Chicago Tribune)

Three squares are so passe. Snacking is having a moment, and — you’re driving it.

You could be a 25-year-old Instagram-loving foodie, who shares daily updates of your homemade mini-meals and trendy restaurant tapas. Or a 33-year-old budding entrepreneur, who opts for smoothies and meal replacement bars because you don’t have time to shop, but have no time for junk food, either. Or a 41-year-old father, who indulges in a daily Starbucks run with co-workers. Or a 65-year-old retiree who isn’t up to preparing dinner anymore and opts for a bowl of popcorn or ice cream instead.

Consumers are driving food industry players — manufacturers and restaurants — to introduce items that satisfy a rapidly growing appetite for smaller meals that can be consumed on the run, even though it may not be the healthiest way to10 eat. Whether the fear of calories posted on restaurant menu boards is causing us to order smaller meals or hectic schedules are driving us to this new kind of eating, major food companies have caught on in a big way.

“The tradition of a piece of fruit or a handful of nuts as a snack — those are still there, but overall the definition of a snack has dramatically changed,” said Technomic President Darren Tristano.

Snacks spell big opportunity for food companies because they tend to be more expensive than traditional meal components. And one look around a grocery store shows that retailers like their potential too, as snacks get more prominent space on shelves, with some healthier fare being stocked in the produce department.

At cereal powerhouse Kellogg, whose brands include Pringles, Cheez-It, Keebler and TownHouse crackers, snacks have gone from 20 percent of its business in 2000 to almost 50 percent today.

This year, the company expects brands that have been struggling, like Kashi and Special K, to lead the growth. Both saw strong sales in the early 2000s, but fell out of favor when consumers steered away from “diet food,” Kellogg CEO John Bryant said on a conference call last week.

The brands have been revamped, and boxes include buzzwords like “nourish” instead of “diet,” and Kellogg is focusing the brands on hand-held forms, instead of just cereal by the bowl. “The expectation of consumers in the snack market has changed,” he said.

But Kellogg also expects brands like Pringles and Cheez-Its will be strong, and it is hurrying to develop more single-serve packages for its snacks so they become a grab-and-go item in a convenience or drug store.

At Hormel, whose meat brands including Jenni-O and Spam, it’s Wholly Guacamole that’s stealing the show, particularly in single-serve containers, according to CEO Jeff Ettinger. Hormel also recently introduced Skippy PB Bites with either a crunchy peanut butter or pretzel core.

Oak Brook-based TreeHouse Foods used to count beverages as its biggest category, but a 2014 acquisition propelled its snacks category to No. 1, and it now says it’s the largest private-label trail mix maker in the U.S.

Even health care companies are entering the snack market.

Abbott Laboratories, maker of Pedialyte, Ensure and Similac formula, earlier this month launched a line of snack bars called Curate aimed at adults seeking healthier alternatives to chips or cookies.

And last month, Chicago-based Hillshire Brands introduced a line of snacks aimed squarely at the young Instagram-addicted foodie, launched at a VIP event in New York with a former “Top Chef” contestant and Bravo’s Andy Cohen. The snacks include chicken bites with sauces like mango habanero and spicy chipotle and “small plates” of salame, cheese and crackers.

“Consumers are shifting away from this traditional snacking definition to include a more expanded variety of options to satisfy a more sophisticated food palate,” said Jeff Caswell, vice president and general manager of Hillshire Snacking. “This evolving definition is being spearheaded by millennials. … They have a passion for food exploration and like to try new flavors and push boundaries.”

He said sales of the new line have exceeded expectations.

Millennials, the largest segment of the U.S. population, are driving the snacking industry to create more fresh, healthy and protein-packed options, but other generations are partaking as well. People tend to snack more as they age, in part because older adults don’t have young families to cook for, said Darren Seifer, an NPD Group food and beverage analyst. The biggest snackers are those 55 to 64, NPD’s research shows.

But more snacking doesn’t always mean hitting the vending machine for a bag of M&Ms. Americans are eating fewer sweet snacks, choosing to save them for an evening indulgence, Seifer said. Their consumption fell about 5 percent in the past decade, compared with savory snacks like chips and beef jerky, which grew by 7 percent in the same period. Meanwhile, so-called “better-for-you” snacks like yogurt and cottage cheese cups have grown 25 percent.

“We start off the day with the best of intentions and then about 8 p.m., after you put the kids to bed, we’re allowing ourselves a bit of indulgence,” he said.

Deerfield-based Oreo maker Mondelez has seen both sides of America’s snacking obsession. Spurred by slowing sales of sweet snacks, it introduced Oreo thins to cater to those who want a healthier version. Mondelez, which also makes Ritz crackers, Cadbury chocolate, Sour Patch Kids and Honey Maid graham crackers, says it’s also focusing on smaller sizes for its brands to cater to snackers.

The company already derives 85 percent of its sales from snacks, up 10 percent from a year ago, and it sees a great deal of growth potential this year.

“Why do we like snacks so much? Quite simply, because of their growth potential. Snacking is a $1.2 trillion market, and it’s growing everywhere around the world,” said Mondelez CEO Irene Rosenfeld at a conference last week.

Smaller, more frequent meals may appeal to many Americans, but they’re not necessarily the healthiest option.

“Snacking or frequent eating tends to be less satisfying to your brain,” said Georgie Fear, a registered dietician and author of “Lean Habits For Lifelong Weight Loss.” “It’s hard to feel like we’ve eaten if we’ve just unwrapped a bar.”

In general, frequent snacks lead to “more dishes, more calories, and they’ve also hampered people’s decision-making abilities” because people can use snacks as an emotional crutch, Fear added.

There is a place for healthy snacking, Fear said, but she recommends sticking to options like whole fruit and yogurt. “Many people have gone out of their way to shift to smaller, more frequent meals. And then they (get more information) and think, ‘I’ve been washing that much Tupperware and it’s working against me?’ “


Is Chipotle really America’s ’emotionally abusive boyfriend?’

February 25, 2016

Grace E. Cutler
FoxNews.com
February 18, 2016
http://www.foxnews.com/leisure/2016/02/18/chipotle-survival-part-joke/

 

Chipotle has been the brunt of jokes and hit by lawsuits, but some experts are predicting positive growth figures as early as the end of the year. (AP)

Chipotle has been the brunt of jokes and hit by lawsuits, but some experts are predicting positive growth figures as early as the end of the year. (AP)

On Sunday, TV host and comedian John Oliver skewered Chipotle over its food safety problems.

The host of HBO’s “Last Week Tonight,” called Chipotle “America’s preferred over-the-counter laxative.”

He ran down a list of Chipotle’s problems over the past months, including E. Coli, salmonella and norovirus outbreaks. He also had a mock promo showing mice scurrying over food and cited a fake report about a live bird living in a Florida Chipotle as recently as January.

About America’s continued love of the chain, Oliver quips:

“They know it’s bad and they want it even more: Chipotle is now officially America’s emotionally abusive boyfriend.”

“That’s harsh,” Darren Tristano, president of Technomic, a Chicago-based food research firm said about Oliver’s comment. “They shouldn’t be left off the hook, but they deserve the chance to really get back on track.”

Over the weeks, Chipotle has been the target of jokes and critics alike –and rightly so.

The Food and Drug Administration reports 55 people were infected with E. Coli alone across the U.S., which resulted in 21 reported hospitalizations. The chain is now the focus of a criminal investigation by the FDA and it has been slapped with a slew of lawsuits. The latest one –this week–is from a shareholder suing Chipotle, alleging the fast food chain made false and misleading statements about its business to investors.

Chipotle isn’t the only food supplier to have a major outbreak of food-poisoning. In the 1993, Jack in the Box had an E.Coli crisis stemming from undercooked beef patties. More recently, Blue Bell ice cream experienced a listeria outbreak, which forced the tubs off of store shelves. Both companies were able to fix their problems and turn their image around.

But Chipotle’s marketing has centered on the idea that it makes a high quality food. These outbreaks, and Chipotle’s problems in tracing the source, puts that question.

As way help its tarnished image, Chipotle earlier this month closed more than 2,000 locations to get employees up to speed on changes to its food safety measures. It also announced a $10 million investment in local farmers that supply ingredients to the food company. To help build some media buzz around these efforts, chains gave away free burritos.

The give-away was “clearly part of a much larger plan to rebuild trust with the customers,” Bruce Hennes, managing partner of Hennes Communications, a crisis communications firm based in Cleveland, told the Cleveland Plain Dealer.

Just how long it will take for the company turn around public opinion is still unclear, but some experts are predicting positive growth figures as early as the end of the year.

Is that’s hard to believe? Tristano says not really, given the “overwhelming” loyalty they have with some customer groups, especially the 18-35 male demographic.

“Our research indicates that American consumers are very forgiving with restaurant brands they are loyal to and have developed both an affinity and frequency with,” said Tristano.

So is Chipotle America’s “emotionally abusive boyfriend?” Sounds like for some, it’s more like a relationship on the mend.


McDonald’s reaps the benefit of all day breakfasts and table service

February 9, 2016

McDonald's signature rangeEven though we’re only into its second month, 2016 been rather a good year for Steve Easterbrook, McDonald’s chief executive. His football team, Watford, is enjoying its best season in years and much the same can be said for the US fast-food giant.

The company surprised analysts with its latest quarterly results last week, with sales up 5.7pc in the US – nearly twice as much as had been predicted. Global sales are up by 5pc.

It has taken a Briton – albeit one steeped in McDonald’s corporate culture – to revive the most American of institutions, which was in danger of being left behind by rather nimbler competitors in the fast food industry.

From introducing all-day breakfasts throughout the US to testing waiter service at some of its outlets, including in the UK, Easterbrook has overhauled how the company operates at a bewildering pace.

The chain was in something of a mess when Easterbrook took over as chief executive in March 2015. Last August, for the first time in more than 45 years, McDonald’s announced that it was closing more outlets than it was opening.

European sales had dropped by 1.4pc, between 2008-14. In the US, the decline was 3.3pc and in Asia, the Middle East and Africa, once considered a growth region, a rather frightening 9.9pc.

It was not just the dire figures which suggested that McDonald’s was in need of a cultural shift. The company was facing competition from not only its traditional rivals, such as Burger King and Wendy’s, but also from hipper new competitors entering the market, such as Honest, Byron, Five Guys and Shake Shack.

It was pretty clear that the golden arches had lost their sparkle. Within weeks of taking over the reins, Easterbrook appeared on CBS’s This Morning television progamme in the US to signal that the 60-year-old company was in for a radical overhaul.

“We really want to assert McDonald’s as a modern burger company. To do that you have to make meaningful changes in the business,” he said. “The pace of change outside McDonald’s has been a little quicker than the pace of change within. You act your way to success, you can’t talk your way to success.”

For once, this was not empty corporate-speak. All-day breakfasts were tested in San Diego in April, and within months were available at all the company’s 16,000 US restaurants. This has brought back customers who might have gone elsewhere and even tempted in newcomers.

Other changes have seen the introduction of a “McPick menu” where US customers can have two items for only $2, despite the wafer-thin profit margin the deal provides.

The range of burgers has also been increased to include Pico Guacamole and Buffalo Bacon, and diners are now being allowed to customise their burgers. McDonald’s has also launched its first loyalty programme for people who register their details, offering, for example, a free cup of coffee for every five bought at one of its restaurants.

Easterbrook has also done something to improve McDonald’s corporate image, announcing a 10pc pay rise for the 90,000 people who work in outlets directly owned by the company in the US. This has taken their hourly minimum wage to $9.90 an hour – increasing to more than $10 this year – considerably higher than the legal minimum of $7.95.

The one caveat, however, was that the pay rise was limited to those staff who work for the 10pc of restaurants which are owned by the company rather than franchisees. Even the white packaging is being ditched after more than a decade. Instead, food now comes in brown paper bags which, in theory, are seen as more environmentally friendly.

According to a company spokesman, the change is “consistent with our vision to be a modern and progressive burger company” –a phrase now something of a corporate mantra.

“One of the things Easterbrook has done is create a sense of urgency in the the McDonald’s business culture,” said Mark Kalinowski, a restaurant analyst at Nomura in New York. “When the company started trialling the all-day breakfast in San Diego county in April, it only took until October before it went nationwide.

“He doesn’t want to waste time, he operates on speed to market and saw it was clearly something customers wanted.

“For McDonald’s, that is rather quick. Although it can be innovative, the company is traditionally slow- moving. I think it’s a reflection on its sheer size.” Even though Easterbrook has spent much of his career with McDonald’s, having joined in 1993, he also spent time with the rather more upmarket Wagamama and Pizza Express chains. He returned to McDonald’s in 2013 as chief brand officer, having held previous roles including its head of Europe.

“Most of the presidents and chief executives at McDonald’s we have seen have been promoted from within. Having somebody with an outside perspective is exactly what the company needed” said Darren Tristano, president of Technomic, a Chicago-based company specialising in the food industry.

Tristano believes that Easterbrook’s strategy has been shrewd. “He has aggressively marketed the all-day breakfast, which has put McDonald’s back at the top of the mind of consumers.

“The price point appeals to lower and middle-income consumers who are looking for something which is less expensive than the dinner menu. This has helped McDonald’s get back some of the market share which it had been losing to rivals.”

McDonald’s has also been helped by the rehabilitation of the egg in the mind of the consumer, Tristano added.

“If you go back a few years, eggs were seen as high-cholesterol. Now they are seen as high-protein and eggs are a key part of breakfast.

“The sales growth on a year over year basis is over a few years of weak sales performance, so the numbers are good but we should expect to see sustainable growth and especially year over year, fourth quarter 2016 would signal McDonald’s is officially back.

“McDonald’s appears to be listening to their customers and staying more true to their brand under Easterbrook.”

The consensus appears to that Easterbrook has enabled McDonald’s to regain its mojo. “He has brought a sense of strategic clarity, said John Quelch, professor of marketing at Harvard Business School.

“There is a tendency when a company gets into trouble to sling products at the wall and see what sticks. All that does is adds complexity. If you reach a point when you can’t explain to an employee or a franchisee what the point of a product is, then how can you expect them to explain that to a customer?

“The bench strength of McDonald’s is enormously good. It is no surprise that they were able to find somebody like him to step up,” added Quelch.