World of Beer to open taverns in China this year, India and the Philippines are next

February 17, 2016
Justine Griffin, Times Staff Writer
Tampa Bay Times
Thursday, February 11, 2016
http://www.tampabay.com/news/business/retail/world-of-beer-to-open-taverns-in-china-this-year-india-and-the-philippines/2265064

Paul Avery, CEO of Tampa-based World of Beer, is pushing the craft beer tavern chain into new international markets this year. 
[Photo courtesy of World of Beer]World of Beer is about to become an international brand.

This year the Tampa-based tavern chain known for its extensive craft beer offerings will open its first overseas bar in Shanghai, CEO Paul Avery said. After that, World of Beer is headed to India and the Philippines. For Avery, a 20-year veteran of the Outback Steakhouse chain, the move to open franchisee-owned taverns overseas is the next logical step for the brand’s growth.

“I am very confident that World of Beer will do well in international markets,” Avery said. “Craft beer is already there. But no one out there offers what we do.”

Americans like to think that beer is solely a yellow, bubbly beverage born in the United States, thanks to brands like Budweiser and Coors, said Brian Connors with Connors Davis Hospitality, a global food and beverage consulting firm in Fort Lauderdale. But every country has a beer culture, he said.

“What you’re seeing is this globalization of American concepts that are flourishing overseas. World of Beer isn’t the first, but it’s part of this wave of fast casual restaurants and gastropubs that are popping up in new markets,” Connors said. “Beer is globally accepted. It’s a good move.”

Avery, 56, joined World of Beer as the company’s CEO in January 2013 when he bought a controlling interest for an undisclosed price. In just three years, World of Beer hardly looks like it did when it launched in 2007. The bar now offers an array of craft cocktails. The footprint is nearly double in size. And most of the taverns serve food.

The 6,000-square-foot World of Beer that opened in September on Fowler Avenue near the University of South Florida offers an open-air bar atmosphere and its own kitchen. It represents what many World of Beer locations will look like soon, Avery said. And when the World of Beer in West Shore’s Avion Park opens in May, it will have a two-story patio called “the flight deck.”

“The taverns that don’t have kitchens yet will get them soon. We’re working on converting all of them,” he said.

Just don’t call World of Beer a restaurant.

“The focus is still on craft beer,” Avery said. “But we knew we had to expand what we offered in order for this to be sustainable. We think the new food menu and craft cocktails only broaden our appeal.”

Restaurant analysts agree.

“The pub experience is one for social gathering that just so happens to have great food and great cocktails,” Connors said. “It’s a smart move by World of Beer, and I think a lot of what’s behind it is millennial-driven. Even at a chain, consumers look for that authentic beer and food experience these days.”

There’s a lot competition, too, in the craft beer market. In Tampa Bay alone, World of Beer competes directly with another craft beer bar chain, the Brass Tap; local brewpubs; and a slew of restaurants that sell craft and locally brewed beer. That’s not to mention the dozens of local breweries that have started up on both sides of the bay.

“As high-quality craft beer has grown and can be found in most bars and restaurants, competition is heating up and the pressure to deliver a better and more unique experience is more pressing,” said Darren Tristano, president of Technomic, a Chicago food research firm. “Their strategy appears to be putting them on track to satisfying a more broad-based consumer occasion set by expanding to food and cocktails.”

World of Beer has 77 locations in 19 states, including taverns in Manhattan and Kentucky, which opened last year. Of those, 14 are company owned and the rest are owned by franchisees. Avery said World of Beer will open 35 new restaurants this year, including at least one of the three planned for overseas in Shanghai.

The goal is to grow the number of company-owned stores to 30 percent, Avery said.

“It’s a great investment for our shareholders, and it makes us a better franchiser when we know what the day-to-day operations are like,” he said.


How 10 Food Trends for 2016 Will Transform Restaurants

November 2, 2015

2015 Forbes.com LLC™ All Rights Reserved
http://www.forbes.com/sites/darrentristano/2015/10/28/how-10-food-trends-for-2016-will-transform-restaurants/

At this point a couple years ago, if you asked a restaurant executive how she might user Uber to build sales, she might have guessed as a prefix for the name of her brand’s Oktoberfest-theme burger. But now, Uber and Postmates are just two of the sharing-economy apps rapidly transforming foodservice and shaking up consumers’ expectations everywhere.
Going into 2016, there are dozens of similar forces shifting the ground beneath restaurants, and most of them are far beyond what brands have the power to control. While they are hard to predict, even for a data-rich firm like Technomic, they are easy to identify and understand, because they all spring from evolving consumer demand. Major moves from the biggest restaurant companies—McDonald’s moving its food supply toward more cage-free eggs, for example—aren’t dictated solely by the bottom line. They’re dictated by what consumers need from foodservice brands.

Technomic just released its 10 major food trends for 2016 with this dynamic in mind. Because consumers are the impetus behind all the upheaval, take a look at each trend and see how many of them you’re driving with your own dining out preferences.

The Sriracha Effect: This hot sauce from Thailand will continue to grow in popularity, but the “effect” Technomic predicts is that chefs and chain restaurant executives will search for the next hot ethnic flavor to find lightning in a bottle again. Early indications are that this will drive more use of and consumer interest in ghost pepper from India, sambal from Southeast Asia, gochujang from Korea, and harissa, sumac and dukka from North Africa.

The Delivery Revolution: Popular apps that simplify online and mobile ordering making “dining in” even easier and, in some cases, “dining out” irrelevant. Delivery services like GrubHub are starting to proliferate far beyond urban centers, bringing the convenience of a restaurant meal home, where plenty of people are likely camping out in front of the TV to binge-watch a season or two on Netflix. Other services are muscling in, including the aforementioned Uber and Amazon, which is expanding its Prime Fresh memberships for grocery delivery.

One particular threat to restaurants could be app-only services like Munchery, which delivers restaurant-quality food from a commissary, cutting out brick-and-mortar restaurants completely.

Negative on GMOs: In some cases, consumers have made up their minds before scientists have reached consensus, but many restaurant customers are declaring genetically modified organisms to be nonstarters. Many diners will agree with calls for labels of GMOs on menus and food packaging; some will go further and gravitate toward restaurants that advertise a GMO-free menu. That will be a major issue for the nation’s food supply, since many crops—particularly soy fed to livestock and other animal feeds—have been modified to boost their yields and productivity.

Modernizing the Supply Chain: Speaking of the supply chain, it already has enough challenges to deal with, including climate destabilization, rising costs for transportation and shipping, and pests. These will cause frequent repeats of shortages similar to those witnessed in 2015, like the unseasonable freeze that decimated Florida’s orange crop or the egg shortage that resulted from avian flu. Those hurdles will proliferate while more and more consumers demand food that is “fresh,” “local,” or just free of additives and artificial ingredients. Every brand, from restaurants to grocery stores and convenience stores, will make big investments in supply chain management in 2016.

Year of the Worker: Restaurants will also contend with rising labor costs, because of new mandates to cover full-time staff with health insurance and because the minimum wage could increase sharply depending on the state or city where they’re located. Pressure groups will ratchet up their call for a $15-per-hour wage, and they could possibly succeed in more cities like they have in New York and Seattle. Don’t expect any changes to the federal wage floor of $7.25 per hour, because no cooperation between a Democratic White House and a Republican Congress is possible, especially in an election year.
How will restaurants respond? Most will raise their wages to either comply with a new law or to compete for the best staff—but that means menu prices are going up as well, everywhere from fast food to fine dining. Also, more brands will experiment with technology and automation in the kitchens and the dining rooms to do more with fewer employees.

Fast Food Refresh: Consumers gravitate to “better” quick-service restaurants, which has transformed the industry. That has created a subset of “QSR-Plus” concepts with fresher menus and more contemporary designs, which exploits a price threshold between fast food and fast casual. Culver’s, Chick-fil-A and In-N-Out Burger are examples of this. “Build-your-own” menus are springing up across the industry, and many quick-service brands are adding amenities like alcohol.
QSR-Plus also helps other restaurants clarify their positioning by giving up their attempt to go upscale in a piecemeal approach, and those chains instead are returning to their roots with simplified menus and lower prices.

Elevating Peasant Fare: The popularity of street foods and consumers’ demand for portability and affordability have put things like meatballs, sausages and even breads back in the spotlight. But this time, those meatballs might have a nouveau twist, such as a blend of fancier meats like duck or lamb. Multiethnic dumplings will also continue to grow in popularity, from Eastern European pierogi to Asian bao.

Trash to Treasure: Rising prices for proteins will raise the profile of underused cuts of meat, organ meats or “trash fish.” The “use it all” mindset has also moved beyond the center of the plate. Some restaurants will use carrot pulp from the juicer to make a veggie burger patty, and perhaps other chains will follow the lead of Sweetgreen, which last year partnered with celebrity chef Dan Barber to make the wastED Salad, an entrée that saves vegetable scraps like broccoli stalks and cabbage cores and combines them with upscale ingredients like shaved Parmesan and pesto vinaigrette.

Let them eat kale stems!

Burned: Smoke and fire are showing up everywhere on the menu—smoky is the new spicy. Look for more charred- or roasted-vegetable sides, desserts with charred fruits or burnt-sugar toppings, or cocktails featuring smoked salt, smoked ice or smoky syrups.

Bubbly: Effervescence makes light work of the trendiest beverages. Technomic expects rapid sales growth of Champagnes and Proseccos, Campari-and-soda aperitifs, and adults-only “hard” soft drinks like ginger ales and root beers. In the nonalcoholic space, sales will also increase for fruit-based artisanal soda and sparkling teas.


Snacking and Healthier Options are on the Rise

October 30, 2015

pictureSnacking is a growing trend and consumers are snacking more frequently. About half of today’s consumers (51 percent) say they eat snacks at least twice a day and 31 percent say they’re snacking more frequently than they were two years ago.

According to Technomic, Americans also are broadening their definition of a snack to encompass a wider range of foods and beverages.

Smoothies are they a snack or a meal? According to Vitamix and ORC International, 59 percent is snack, 25 percent is part of a meal and 18 percent meal.

“Snacking occasions represent a growth channel for restaurant operators. The retail market is aggressively promoting snacks, but there’s plenty of room for restaurants to expand their snack programs and grab share. By providing more innovative, healthy and easily portable snacks, and boosting variety, restaurants can position themselves to increase incremental traffic and sales –particularly among a younger customer base.” Darren Tristano, executive vice president of Technomic.

In an article by WholeFoods Magazine called “Healthy Snacking on the Rise in the US” this article reports that more Americans are snacking more than ever before – but are also make smarter snacking choices. In a recent survey taken, 33% of the survey population is snacking on healthier foods than they were last year. This number has steadily risen with time, and is something that only stands to increase with nearly a third of all parents surveyed mentioning that they are serving healthier snacks to their children.

What a great opportunity for any restaurant, café, juice or smoothie bar to take advantage of this growing trend. Now more than ever it is important to offer customers what they want and that is healthier options.

The healthy trend is also dominating menus. Gone are the days of serving only indulgent foods or offering calorie laden menu items. The most prominent industry buzzword over that last decade is healthy which appears in various forms on today’s menus. This change has been inspired by the growing public awareness of healthy attributes in food and consumers are leaning on restaurants to go beyond adding a side salad to create a healthy meal.


Has America FINALLY hit ‘peak pumpkin’?

October 28, 2015

pumpkinKatie Little
© 2015 CNBC LLC. All Rights Reserved. A Division of NBCUniversal
http://www.cnbc.com/2015/10/02/has-america-finally-hit-peak-pumpkin.html

More than a decade after Starbucks helped make “pumpkin spice latte” a household name, there is some evidence that “peak pumpkin” may finally be coming to restaurants.

The country’s 500 biggest restaurants launched just 45 pumpkin flavored limited-time offerings, such as Dairy Queen’s Pumpkin Pie Blizzard Cake or Krispy Kreme’s Pumpkin Spice Doughnut, from January to September. That’s down 61 percent from 116 a year ago, according to data from Technomic.

“Although many consumers are still interested in pumpkin spice, recent years have shown heavy saturation with beverages and although the flavor is likely here to stay, the growth of the trend is starting to flatten showing we have reached maturity,” wrote Darren Tristano, executive vice president at Technomic, in an email.

Overall promotions are shrinking as well, falling 11 percent as operators adopt a “less is more” attitude borrowed from fast-casual restaurant hits like Shake Shack and Chipotle.

“Brands are starting to discover the fact that consumers are experiencing new menu burnout,” Tristano wrote. “This year marked the first year in a decade that top chain restaurant menus declined in total menu offering.”

At the retail level, growth is also showing signs of slowing.

For the year ending July 26, sales of pumpkin-flavored items rose 11.6 percent, the slowest growth in at least three years, according to Nielsen data. Declines in pumpkin-flavored coffee, milk and frozen waffles, pancakes and French toast were especially steep. Still, pumpkin-flavored item sales remain a large market, clocking in at $360 million at retail outlets, including grocery and convenience stores.

So if pumpkin has reached saturation, which seasonal item will start to take share? This is difficult to predict, Tristano says, adding it’s possible other seasonal flavors like gingerbread, molasses, peppermint or eggnog could increase.


U.S. Taco Closes: Taco Bell Shutters Experimental Upscale Eatery in Huntington Beach

September 28, 2015

Nancy Luna
Tribune Content Agency, LLC
(c)2015 The Orange County Register (Santa Ana, Calif.)
http://www.ocregister.com/articles/taco-683078-bell-restaurant.html

Taco Bell has closed U.S. Taco Co., an experimental fast-casual restaurant that failed to generate the kind of foot traffic needed to sustain the year-old Huntington Beach taco eatery.

The upscale “American taco” concept was the chain’s attempt to win the taste buds of sophisticated fast-casual eaters. But the Irvine-based chain cited “lower than anticipated foot traffic” and “hurdles securing alcohol permits” as challenges contributing to its decision to close U.S. Taco.

The Day of the Dead-themed eatery, at 150 5th St., closed Thursday.

Taco Bell said the closure allows the company to focus on Taco Bell Cantina, the company’s new urban concept that caters to its next generation of customers — millennials. The first cantina restaurant, which will offer an enhanced Taco Bell menu along with beer, wine and alcohol-infused slushie beverages, opens Tuesday in Chicago.

The next cantina will open later this month in San Francisco. Taco Bell said they are incorporating successful features from U.S. Taco — its open kitchen layout and edgy design — into new concepts like cantina. And, despite its closure, future U.S. Taco restaurants may open, the chain said.

“U.S. Taco Co. remains a fantastic concept, and was very successful as a place to experiment and learn,” Taco Bell Chief Executive Brian Niccol said.

Last year, Taco Bell unveiled U.S. Taco., a slick counter-service eatery attempting to appeal to non-Taco Bell eaters with disposable income. Jumping into the fast-growing $34 billion fast-casual space, the experimental restaurant featured a menu of American-inspired tacos, milkshakes and seasoned fries. Each taco was a twist on a classic regional dish — from an East Coast lobster roll to Texas-style brisket.

But from its inception, U.S. Taco ran into one major hitch.

The original “taproom” business model included a menu of craft beer and wine. But the eatery, located in the city’s bar heavy downtown, was unable to secure an alcohol license when it opened. The restaurant was finally able to secure a permit this summer.

Restaurant industry analyst Darren Tristano said brands “moving upscale” face challenges, including higher operating costs and higher price points.

Adding alcohol to your menu also is tough: “Adult beverage is not in (Taco Bell’s) DNA so it can be a difficult transition,” said Tristano of Chicago-based Technomic.

Tristano, who had visited U.S. Taco during visits to California, said legacy brands like Taco Bell should be true to their brand. In the case of Taco Bell, that’s “convenient, consistent, high value and indulgent crave able food.”


Hard Pass on Alcohol and Fast Food Combinations

September 2, 2015

Rachael Andersen
(c) Copyright 2015, Argus Leader. All Rights Reserved.
http://www.argusleader.com/story/blogs/beerblog/2015/08/26/hard-pass-alcohol-and-fast-food-combinations/32392715/

I generally try to keep a pretty open mind, and overall I am tolerant of some pretty strange ideas … even if I don’t agree with all of them.

There are a few things, however, that I just can’t completely wrap my brain around.

Take fast food, for example. It makes total sense to me. You’re in a hurry. You’re starving, and you need to grab a quick bite. Find the nearest drive-through, and your problems are no more.

Now, consider a beer menu at a restaurant. I not only understand this, I condone it. There is nothing more relaxing than enjoying a beverage at dinner while in good company.

But when you combine those two concepts, you end up with a (somewhat) new trend that I’m just not sure if I can get behind: beer (and other alcohol) offerings at fast food restaurants.

For the past five years or so, well-known fast food giants have begun offering alcoholic beverages at select locations. Favorites such as Burger King, Sonic, Qdoba, Chipotle, White Castle, and others offer choices of bottled beer and wine, and in some instances, mixed liquor drinks. Even Starbucks is in on the trend, offering an “evening menu,” which includes beer, wine and appetizer options.

Most recently, Taco Bell has started marketing beer, wine and frozen cocktails. “Just put yourself in the mind of the young male customer,” said Darren Tristano, executive vice president at Technomic. “He might want to have a chalupa. But he’s with a female, who says, ‘I really don’t want to have Mexican, but I’d love a glass of wine.’ You’ve eliminated the veto vote by providing what is likely going to be a nicely priced wine.”

I may be an anomaly, but when I want a glass of wine, I don’t typically imagine myself enjoying it in a teal-and-purple plastic swivel chair at a table smeared with nacho cheese and old lettuce shreds. This is not to say I’m not a fan of Taco Bell and its undeniable charm, but there is a time and place for everything.

Additionally, I consider most fast food restaurants to be family-friendly. Beer can certainly be present in these types of environments, but there will inevitably be people who abuse the offerings. I definitely wouldn’t want to bring children around these situations.

One must also consider the fast-paced, “grab-and-go” nature of fast food restaurants. Obviously, these fast food chains are not offering beer for sale in their drive-throughs. But consider this: When was the last time that you sat down to eat at a fast food restaurant and stayed longer than about half an hour? If I drink a beer, I like to give myself time to enjoy it and let it digest a bit before I leave a restaurant. I have to wonder if the fast-paced environment of these restaurants may lead people to down a drink and hit the road.

I’m all for restaurants expanding their business and trying new things. And I undoubtedly enjoy seeing beer selections at various eateries. But I’m just not sure I can get behind the idea of beer at fast food restaurants. When I think of a bar, I think of beer. When I think of Starbucks, I think of coffee. When I think of Taco Bell, I think of guiltily delicious faux Mexican. I’m just not sure that the trouble of attaining a liquor license is worth it for these fast food chains.

Although Sioux Falls has yet to see much of this trend, if it’s successful in bigger metropolis areas, I don’t think we’re too far behind. Maybe by the time wine is offered at my favorite Starbucks, I’ll be more open to the idea. But for now, when the cashier at Burger King asks if I’d like a beer with that, I’ll reply, “Nah — I’ll stick to fries.”


App May Offer Doughnuts on Demand ; Dunkin’ is Exploring a Delivery Service

June 17, 2015

8849e1f883b10fbaf86357823c2ecf69Taryn Luna
© 2015 The Boston Globe. Provided by ProQuest Information and Learning. All Rights Reserved.
http://www.betaboston.com/news/2015/06/09/dunkin-donuts-app-may-offer-doughnuts-on-demand/

At a time when a consumer can use an app on a smartphone to have a bottle of whiskey or an iPad Air delivered to the door in an hour, an instant order of munchkins and a Box O’ Joe might not be far behind.

Dunkin’ Donuts is the latest quick-service restaurant chain to wade into the so-called on-demand economy, acknowledging Monday that it is evaluating delivery services in conjunction with new mobile ordering technology the coffee-and-doughnuts chain is developing.

Dunkin’ is following in the footsteps of two rivals, Starbucks Corp. and McDonald’s Corp., both of which are testing deliveries to homes and offices this year.

Nigel Travis, chief executive of Dunkin’ Brands Group, the parent company, called delivery a “big opportunity” in an interview with CNBC.

The company said delivery might be built into an application currently in development. The app, which Dunkin’ began testing last year, would allow customers to order and purchase coffee and food on a smartphone and pick it up at a store.

Dunkin’ declined to provide details about how a delivery service would work and said it has not begun to test the system.

Dunkin’ Donuts and other fast-food chains face a particular challenge in delivering products: keeping their hot food and drinks at the right temperatures, said Darren Tristano, an executive vice president at Technomic Inc., a Chicago food industry research firm. While things like pizza and Chinese food retain heat during transport, Tristano said, some fast-food products don’t survive as well.

“It might reflect negatively on the brand,” Tristano said. “There’s great risk along with the opportunities.”

Food chains are quickly trying to catch up with the explosive popularity of on-demand delivery services such as Postmates and GrubHub, which can provide nearly anything consumers want, whenever they want it. The chains also hope deliveries will increase sales in a relatively stagnant quick-service industry.

Dunkin’ Donuts’ same-store sales in the United States increased 1.6 percent in fiscal 2014, compared with 3.4 percent the year before. Meanwhile, McDonald’s comparable sales declined 2.1 percent in 2014. Starbucks, the leading coffee and bakery chain in the country, reported a 6 percent jump during the same period.

Earlier this year, Starbucks and McDonald’s said they both planned to work with Postmates, the San Francisco-based 24-hour service, to deliver in select markets. Customers place orders on the Postmates app or website and local couriers pick up the goods from restaurants and stores. An order of a Big Mac and medium fries from McDonald’s, which includes a $5 delivery fee, costs about $11.

Although many consumers already can order a Big Mac or a Frappuccino through the Postmates system, the partnerships allow companies to integrate the ordering process into the food chains’ own mobile applications, control the transaction, and track consumer interests, Tristano said.

Starbucks said it will launch a “Green Apron” program with actual baristas delivering coffee in New York later this year.

Dunkin’s delivery and mobile ordering initiatives are being led by Scott Hudler, global vice president of consumer engagement.

The company said he was not available for an interview.

Tristano said Dunkin’s delivery service would probably increase sales modestly as existing customers shift to delivery. He said the service would appeal to consumers who are physically unable to visit a store, don’t have a car, don’t want to deal with parking, or “are just lazy and don’t want to get up and go.”


The Brass Tap to Open a Microbrewery in Carrollwood Bar

June 16, 2015

0435873611_15361234_8colJustine Griffin
Copyright 2015 Times Publishing Company. All Rights Reserved.
http://www.tampabay.com/news/business/retail/the-brass-tap-to-open-a-microbrewery-in-carrollwood-bar/2232977

The Brass Tapknows its customers can go just about anywhere to find a good beer these days.

In an effort to offer a more authentic experience beyond sampling the hundreds of beers it sells on tap and in bottles, the chain is opening its own microbrewery inside its bar on N Dale Mabry Highway in Carrollwood. The move to brew its own beer comes about a year after the chain abruptly closed its downtown St. Petersburg bar next to Rococo Steak. Despite the closure, the chain is still expanding aggressively, with four franchise locations poised to open in Florida this year and five others in the works in Texas, North Carolina and California.

“If you’re going to be a part of the craft beer movement, you have to be a destination,” said Darren Tristano, executive vice president with Technomic, a Chicago-based restaurant research firm. “You have to be more exclusive. By brewing beer in-house, the Brass Tap is driving more credit to its brand.”

And with more competitors saturating the market, such as World of Beer and the Yard House craft beer and restaurant chain, you have to stand out.

“It’s amazing how many people want to open a brewery,” Tristano said.

Microbreweries are sprouting in record numbers in Tampa Bay and across the country. The industry recorded a 127 percent spike in the number of breweries that opened in 2014 compared with 2012, according to the Brewers Association trade group. More than 600 breweries opened in the United States last year, including Coppertail Brewing Co. in Tampa. In St. Petersburg, 3 Daughters Brewing opened in December 2013, and a half dozen others, such as 7venth Sun Brewery in Dunedin and Big Storm Brewing Co. in Odessa, opened in 2012.

Rory Malloy, the Brass Tap’s new brewing operations manager, will brew beer from a two-barrel “nano” system in a small brewery marked off by a glass wall from the rest of the Carrollwood bar. The beer will be offered for sale at the bar, and customers can watch and ask questions while Malloy brews. He hopes to brew his first beer by the end of the month.

“We’ve always used this location to train franchisee owners and test new products,” said Chris Elliott, CEO of Beef ‘O’ Brady’s, which purchased the Brass Tap in 2012. “The microbrewery is a test for us. Our customers already love craft beer and many of them are interested in the process. Now they can learn more about it here in our bar.”

The concept has been in the works for nearly two years, Elliott said. The Brass Tap worked with Cigar City Brewing CEO Joey Redner on the concept. Cigar City will be among the first of many local breweries invited to brew a guest batch of beer at the Brass Tap microbrewery, Elliott said.

The chain hopes to partner with many of Tampa Bay’s local breweries, and some national ones too, such as Samuel Adams and Founders.

The idea isn’t to compete with breweries for customers. It’s to partner with them.

“There are so many breweries opening within a 5-mile radius of us,” Malloy said. “We can all share our resources.”

The Brass Tap may offer home-brewing courses at the microbrewery.

“The craft beer segment started getting hot in the ’90s, when a lot of guys were trying to do brewpubs that offered food and beer. The overhead was huge and the audience just wasn’t there,” said Brian Connors of Connors Davis Hospitality, a global food and beverage consulting firm based in Fort Lauderdale. “One of the best things to happen to the craft beer movement is the millennial generation. They’re willing to pay more for something of quality that’s made locally.”


Beverage Marketing Corporation and Technomic Form Alliance to Offer Enhanced Beverage Trend Insights

March 31, 2015

http://www.beveragemarketing.com/news-detail.asp?id=334

New York, February 24, 2015 — Beverage Marketing Corporation, the leading provider of consulting, data and insight to the beverage industry is pleased to announced a strategic alliance with Technomic Inc., the leading provider of research and consulting in the foodservice industry. Through this alliance, Beverage Marketing and Technomic will provide unparalleled depth of market information to the ever–evolving beverage industry, its suppliers and advisors.

As the first step in this new relationship, Beverage Marketing Corporation’s DrinkTell™ Database With Market Forecasts, the premier beverage information portal, will now incorporate wine and spirits category, company and brand data developed by Technomic. With this latest phase in its ongoing development complete, BMC’s DrinkTell™ now covers 29 alcohol and non–alcohol beverage categories, 60 sub–categories, more than 430 companies and 2,472 brands.

“With the addition of Technomic’s wine and spirits data to our already robust system, DrinkTell™ is now the most complete U.S. data and intelligence resource available anywhere, for any beverage category” said Michael Bellas, Chairman & CEO of Beverage Marketing Corporation. “With just a few clicks from any device, the beverage information you need is immediately available whether you’re at your desk, in a meeting or on the road. We’re really pleased with the quality of Technomic’s data and are looking forward to working with them on future projects both within and outside of the DrinkTell™ portal,” Bellas added.

“We’re highly impressed with the depth and breadth and ease of access to key data provided by the DrinkTell™ platform and are excited to be strengthening it with the addition of select data from our comprehensive DRINK adult beverage knowledge platform,” said Darren Tristano, Executive Vice President of Technomic. “Tremendous synergies exist between BMC and Technomic, and we see this collaborative effort as the first step in delivering enhanced value to the beverage industry.”

About Beverage Marketing Corporation

New York City–based Beverage Marketing Corporation is the leading consulting, research, and advisory services firm dedicated to the global beverage industry. Serving the industry for more than 40 years, the company provides extensive strategic and tactical consulting services to most of the beverage industry’s leading companies and many of its key suppliers. Through its BMC Research division, the company also offers more than 50 market trend reports which include in–depth studies of various beverage sectors such as Bottled Water in the U.S. as well as market reports covering a broad range of drink sectors such as New Age Beverages in the U.S. and The Multiple Beverage Marketplace in the U.S. Most recently, the launch of the company’s DrinkTell™ database has provided an easy to use platform for users to access U.S. and global data on a broad range of alcohol and non–alcohol beverage categories. For more information on Beverage Marketing Corporation’s reports, visit bmcreports.com. For more information about DrinkTell™, or to schedule a demo contact Charlene Harvey, 212-688-7640 ext. 1962 or charvey@beveragemarketing.com. Visit us at beveragemarketing.com.

About Technomic

Only Technomic delivers a 360° view of the food industry. We drive growth and profitability for our clients by providing the most reliable, consumer–grounded, channel–relevant data with forward–looking strategic insights. Our services range from major research studies and management consulting solutions to online databases and simple fact–finding assignments. Our clients include food manufacturers and distributors, restaurants and retailers, other foodservice organizations, and various institutions aligned with the food industry. Visit us at technomic.com.


Starting From Scratch With Better Coffee

February 25, 2015

Joan Verdon

https://global.factiva.com/du/article.aspx/?accessionno=WPATHN0020150220eb2k0005u&fcpil=en&napc=T&sa_from=&cat=a

Copyright 2015 Herald News (Woodland Park, NJ). Distributed by NewsBank, inc.

The food-services company Mascott has fed its growth by introducing other people’s restaurant and food franchise ideas to North Jersey. Now it wants to build a beverage and food concept from the ground up.

Hillside-based Mascott, which brought the first Smashburger and Noodles & Co. restaurants to Bergen and Passaic counties, is launching a coffee-shop business called Ground Connection that it hopes will become a home-grown New Jersey hit. The company opened the first Ground Connection last week at The Shops at Riverside in Hackensack and plans to open three more locations in Livingston and Jersey City in the spring and summer.

Just as Smashburger sizzled as the “better burger” trend exploded, Mascott Chief Executive Officer Scott Gillman is betting the “better coffee” movement will create demand for Ground Connection. The shops serve small-batch roasts, use specially sourced milk and flavorings, and buy its sandwich breads, salads and other foods from local suppliers.

Gillman said he is trying to bring the coffee connoisseur experience found at some of the hot big-city artisanal coffee chains such as Blue Bottle Coffee, Stumptown Coffee Roasters and Intelligentsia Coffee to the suburbs, with prices and an atmosphere friendlier to suburban shoppers.

“There’s a huge movement into specialty coffee,” Gillman said. “It’s a better quality coffee. Often it’s handpicked. It’s relationship coffee,” he said, with the roasters developing a relationship with small farms.

Rather than trying to become a franchisee for an existing artisanal coffee brand, just as he did with burgers and Smashburger, this time Gillman decided to create his own response to a trend.

“I wanted to do what I thought would sell the best, and also what would sell the best in the suburbs,” he said. Brands like Blue Bottle, while it has millennials lining up and willing to wait for single-brewed cups, probably would be too expensive and too slow-paced to succeed with suburban mall shoppers. The Ground Connection’s prices are comparable to Starbucks’, at $1.75 for an 8-ounce cup and $2.75 for a 16-ounce, but are 50 cents to 75 cents lower than other specialty coffee brands.

Gillman and Mascott are entering the coffee field at a time when the competition is heating up, according to research firm IBISWorld, which noted in a report in December that the two biggest coffee chains, Starbucks and Dunkin’ Donuts, plan to open hundreds of stores over the next five years.

While the artisanal “better” coffee chains are growing their sales by more than 20 percent a year, big players such as Starbucks are hoping to cut into those sales by introducing their own better brands. Starbucks recently rolled out the Starbucks Reserve brand in some 500 of its more than 20,000 stores worldwide, and is selling the small-batch roasts through the mail to subscribers.

Gillman has a proven track record in the food-service industry and a reputation as one of the smartest franchise operators in New Jersey. His company owns an upscale restaurant in Jersey City, Markers, and has operated dozens of franchise restaurants over the past two decades, ranging from Popeye’s Chicken and Biscuits, Cinnabon, and Seattle’s Best Coffee, to more recently Smashburger and Noodles & Co.

Mascott opened the first Smashburger in New Jersey in 2010 in Glen Ridge and built the franchise into 14 locations, before selling them back to the Smashburger Corp., which wanted the high-performing stores in its corporate portfolio.

With the Ground Connection, “I wanted to do something that took everything I learned over 25 years,” and put his own stamp on a concept, Gillman said. He hired Casey Killo, a 21-year-old who already had a half-dozen years of barista experience, to train his baristas. Steve Parker, the corporate chef for Mascott, developed a breakfast and lunch menu that included muffins and pastries baked in a separate kitchen elsewhere in the mall, as well as soups, flatbread pizzas, sandwiches served heated, and salads.

The restaurant serves coffee from Toby’s Estate, a Brooklyn small-batch roaster. The lattes and cappuccinos use milk delivered fresh from Battenkill Valley Creamery in upstate New York, because it is richer than commercially available milk. Central Bakery in Hackensack supplies the sandwich breads, Gillman said. He estimated his start-up costs to open the Riverside location at $500,000.

Curtis Nassau, of Ripco Real Estate in Lyndhurst, which brokered the Riverside lease for Mascott, said Ripco “sees terrific growth potential” for the Ground Connection. Coffee, he said, “is a well-established, yet still expanding category in New Jersey retail.”

The Ground Connection was drawing a healthy lunch crowd on Thursday, and Gillman said the first week’s sales exceeded his expectations.

But success at Riverside could increase his risk from Starbucks, said Darren Tristano, executive vice president of food-industry research firm Technomics. “It isn’t just build them where Starbucks isn’t,” Tristano said. “Once you’ve built it, that kind of gives Starbucks a reason to build one there,” he said. “You’ve proven that the demand is there, and all they would do is come in and take your business away.”

But, Tristano said, there are customers looking for coffee shops that have more of an independent feel than Starbucks. “Although Starbucks fans are very loyal, there’s some really good opportunity to even go beyond that,” he said.

Grounds for expansion; * $30.2 billion – annual U.S. coffee and snack-shop revenue, 2014; * $1.8 billion – profit, 2014; * 2.7 percent – annual growth rate, 2009-14; * 3.8 percent – projected annual growth rate, 2014-19; * 42.4 percent – market share of dominant player Starbucks; * 25.5 percent – market share of second-largest competitor, Dunkin’ Donuts; Source: IBISWorld Coffee & Snack Shops in the U.S., December 2014