McDonald’s reaps the benefit of all day breakfasts and table service

February 9, 2016

McDonald's signature rangeEven though we’re only into its second month, 2016 been rather a good year for Steve Easterbrook, McDonald’s chief executive. His football team, Watford, is enjoying its best season in years and much the same can be said for the US fast-food giant.

The company surprised analysts with its latest quarterly results last week, with sales up 5.7pc in the US – nearly twice as much as had been predicted. Global sales are up by 5pc.

It has taken a Briton – albeit one steeped in McDonald’s corporate culture – to revive the most American of institutions, which was in danger of being left behind by rather nimbler competitors in the fast food industry.

From introducing all-day breakfasts throughout the US to testing waiter service at some of its outlets, including in the UK, Easterbrook has overhauled how the company operates at a bewildering pace.

The chain was in something of a mess when Easterbrook took over as chief executive in March 2015. Last August, for the first time in more than 45 years, McDonald’s announced that it was closing more outlets than it was opening.

European sales had dropped by 1.4pc, between 2008-14. In the US, the decline was 3.3pc and in Asia, the Middle East and Africa, once considered a growth region, a rather frightening 9.9pc.

It was not just the dire figures which suggested that McDonald’s was in need of a cultural shift. The company was facing competition from not only its traditional rivals, such as Burger King and Wendy’s, but also from hipper new competitors entering the market, such as Honest, Byron, Five Guys and Shake Shack.

It was pretty clear that the golden arches had lost their sparkle. Within weeks of taking over the reins, Easterbrook appeared on CBS’s This Morning television progamme in the US to signal that the 60-year-old company was in for a radical overhaul.

“We really want to assert McDonald’s as a modern burger company. To do that you have to make meaningful changes in the business,” he said. “The pace of change outside McDonald’s has been a little quicker than the pace of change within. You act your way to success, you can’t talk your way to success.”

For once, this was not empty corporate-speak. All-day breakfasts were tested in San Diego in April, and within months were available at all the company’s 16,000 US restaurants. This has brought back customers who might have gone elsewhere and even tempted in newcomers.

Other changes have seen the introduction of a “McPick menu” where US customers can have two items for only $2, despite the wafer-thin profit margin the deal provides.

The range of burgers has also been increased to include Pico Guacamole and Buffalo Bacon, and diners are now being allowed to customise their burgers. McDonald’s has also launched its first loyalty programme for people who register their details, offering, for example, a free cup of coffee for every five bought at one of its restaurants.

Easterbrook has also done something to improve McDonald’s corporate image, announcing a 10pc pay rise for the 90,000 people who work in outlets directly owned by the company in the US. This has taken their hourly minimum wage to $9.90 an hour – increasing to more than $10 this year – considerably higher than the legal minimum of $7.95.

The one caveat, however, was that the pay rise was limited to those staff who work for the 10pc of restaurants which are owned by the company rather than franchisees. Even the white packaging is being ditched after more than a decade. Instead, food now comes in brown paper bags which, in theory, are seen as more environmentally friendly.

According to a company spokesman, the change is “consistent with our vision to be a modern and progressive burger company” –a phrase now something of a corporate mantra.

“One of the things Easterbrook has done is create a sense of urgency in the the McDonald’s business culture,” said Mark Kalinowski, a restaurant analyst at Nomura in New York. “When the company started trialling the all-day breakfast in San Diego county in April, it only took until October before it went nationwide.

“He doesn’t want to waste time, he operates on speed to market and saw it was clearly something customers wanted.

“For McDonald’s, that is rather quick. Although it can be innovative, the company is traditionally slow- moving. I think it’s a reflection on its sheer size.” Even though Easterbrook has spent much of his career with McDonald’s, having joined in 1993, he also spent time with the rather more upmarket Wagamama and Pizza Express chains. He returned to McDonald’s in 2013 as chief brand officer, having held previous roles including its head of Europe.

“Most of the presidents and chief executives at McDonald’s we have seen have been promoted from within. Having somebody with an outside perspective is exactly what the company needed” said Darren Tristano, president of Technomic, a Chicago-based company specialising in the food industry.

Tristano believes that Easterbrook’s strategy has been shrewd. “He has aggressively marketed the all-day breakfast, which has put McDonald’s back at the top of the mind of consumers.

“The price point appeals to lower and middle-income consumers who are looking for something which is less expensive than the dinner menu. This has helped McDonald’s get back some of the market share which it had been losing to rivals.”

McDonald’s has also been helped by the rehabilitation of the egg in the mind of the consumer, Tristano added.

“If you go back a few years, eggs were seen as high-cholesterol. Now they are seen as high-protein and eggs are a key part of breakfast.

“The sales growth on a year over year basis is over a few years of weak sales performance, so the numbers are good but we should expect to see sustainable growth and especially year over year, fourth quarter 2016 would signal McDonald’s is officially back.

“McDonald’s appears to be listening to their customers and staying more true to their brand under Easterbrook.”

The consensus appears to that Easterbrook has enabled McDonald’s to regain its mojo. “He has brought a sense of strategic clarity, said John Quelch, professor of marketing at Harvard Business School.

“There is a tendency when a company gets into trouble to sling products at the wall and see what sticks. All that does is adds complexity. If you reach a point when you can’t explain to an employee or a franchisee what the point of a product is, then how can you expect them to explain that to a customer?

“The bench strength of McDonald’s is enormously good. It is no surprise that they were able to find somebody like him to step up,” added Quelch.


Consumers pick top restaurant chains

January 28, 2016
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http://www.argusleader.com/story/news/business-journal/2016/01/19/consumers-pick-top-restaurant-chains/78945800/

Some restaurants with a presence in Sioux Falls were among the winners of the Consumers’ Choice Awards from industry research firm Technomic.

It surveyed consumers about 138 restaurant chains and 60 attributes.

“It’s important to point out that it’s the consumers who rated the chains and selected the winners,” said Darren Tristano, president of Technomic. “In essence, the award is from the customers themselves.”

The winners are:

• Food quality, quick-service category: Papa Murphy’s Take ‘N’ Bake Pizza

• Food quality, fast-casual category: Firehouse Subs

• Food quality, full-service restaurants: Bonefish Grill

• Intent to return, quick-service: In-N-Out Burger

• Intent to return, fast-casual: Rubio’s

• Intent to return, full-service: Cheddar’s Scratch Kitchen

• Provides value through service, quick-service: Chick-fil-A

• Provides value through service, fast-casual: Jimmy John’s Gourmet Sandwiches

• Provides value through service, full-service: Cracker Barrel Old Country Store

• Socially responsible, quick-service: Ben & Jerry’s

• Socially responsible, fast-casual, Chipotle Mexican Grill

• Socially responsible, full-service: Seasons 52


Reaching the Socially Conscious Consumer

March 18, 2014

In the United States, as in the United Kingdom, more and more consumers—especially younger ones—are weighing a company’s efforts in social responsibility when they determine which businesses to patronize. During a presentation at our recent Consumer Trends & Directions conference, Technomic set out to define social responsibility when it comes to the restaurant industry; show how perceptions of social responsibility influence consumers; and look at the impact of social responsibility on business.

Social Responsibility in Restaurants

Social responsibility in restaurants is a complex idea, but has three key aspects:

The environment: This includes recycling programs; packaging (such as disposables made of recycled materials); energy-saving and water-saving practices; and waste disposal and composting. One company doing well in this area is Starbucks. In a growing number of units, the coffee-café chain gives customers the chance to toss paper hot cups into a separate receptacle for recycling or composting.

Community-building: Engagement with the community can involve fundraising; food donation; support of community groups, from providing free meeting space for groups of seniors to sponsoring sports teams; and, particularly in fast-food settings, emphasizing local hiring and offering wages, benefits and advancement opportunities that are better than the industry average. Darden Restaurants, a multiconcept operator whose stable includes The Olive Garden and Red Lobster, among others, brags that its high-profile nonprofit Darden Foundation has awarded more than $71 million in grants to charities since 1995.

Sourcing: Sourcing is simply where the ingredients come from; among other things, socially responsible efforts encompass organic, natural and local items as well as animal welfare (such as free-range poultry and grass-fed beef) and avoidance of hormones and steroids in meat and milk. One chain that has made sourcing key to its brand identity is fast-casual concept Chipotle Mexican Grill, whose “Food With Integrity” promise involves “finding the very best ingredients raised with respect for the animals, the environment and the farmers.” Both suppliers and restaurants must respond to increasing consumer preoccupations with sourcing.

How Social Responsibility Influences Attitudes and Purchases

According to Technomic research, nearly six out of 10 consumers say that when they’re weighing what restaurant to visit, it’s important to them that the establishment be socially responsible.

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Source: Technomic Consumer Brand Metrics 2013

Technomic’s Consumer Brand Metrics program, which tracks how consumers rate 123 leading restaurant chains on a host of experience and reputation attributes, shows that some chains score much higher on social responsibility issues than others. It’s important to consumers that they perceive a restaurant’s values as aligning with their own, so not everyone rates the same chains highest. Nevertheless, there are clear leaders.

When asked to rate chains on the attribute “is socially responsible,” consumers gave ice cream chain Ben & Jerry’s, quick-service chicken concept Chick-fil-A, and coffee giant Starbucks the highest scores. For the attribute “has values that are similar to my own,” Darden’s polished-casual Seasons 52 concept, Ben & Jerry’s, and family-dining chain Cracker Barrel Old Country Stores came out on top. Consumers rated burger QSR McDonald’s, Chick-fil-A, and Ben & Jerry’s highly on the attribute “supports local community activities.” And for “has an excellent reputation,” consumers ranked fast-casual Panera Bread, high-end steakhouse The Capital Grille, and quick-service In-N-Out Burger as the leading chains.

Social responsibility is more important to certain consumers, including ethnic minorities; younger consumers, including Millennials and Generation Z; and, most importantly, heavy restaurant users, who are visiting restaurants more frequently and having a greater impact on total sales. Younger consumers, especially, perceive social responsibility as part of the value equation in a restaurant experience; they see it as worth something because it makes them feel they are spending their money in a way that lets them feel good about themselves.

Base: 1,500 consumers aged 18+ Consumers responded on a 1–6 scale where 1 = not important at all and 6 = extremely important  Source: 2013 Value and Pricing Consumer Trend Report, Technomic

Base: 1,500 consumers aged 18+
Consumers responded on a 1–6 scale where 1 = not important at all and 6 = extremely important
Source: 2013 Value and Pricing Consumer Trend Report, Technomic

Looking at specific efforts, around six out of 10 diners say they’re more likely to visit a restaurant that makes charitable donations of leftover food. Almost as many say they would also be willing to pay more for menu items at restaurants that make food donations. Consumers don’t mind the idea of restaurants promoting their food charity programs. In unaided recall, they were most likely to remember Panera Bread, McDonald’s, Applebee’s, Chili’s, Starbucks and local independent restaurants as donating food.

Waste disposal is another key issue. More than six out of 10 consumers believe that composting of organic waste is so important that it should be mandated by legislation. Recycling programs for non-food waste are also important to many and can be a strong traffic driver; 47% said they’d be more likely to visit a fast-casual restaurant if it offered recycling, and 43% said the same about fast-food restaurants and coffee cafés. Most of those consumers also said they’d be willing to pay more at restaurants that offered such programs, particularly coffee cafés.

Social responsibility initiatives can deepen a brand’s alignment with its customers and thus build sales, as leading restaurant marketers have attested. In a recent letter to shareholders, Panera Bread wrote “[The Live Consciously, Eat Deliciously initiative] is intended to drive a deeper affiliation between Panera and our customers, and we believe such an effort has the potential to deliver a greater, long-term return on investment from advertising than more promotional messaging.” And Starbucks CEO Howard Schultz said, “I think that the rules of engagement for a public company are changing…I believe strongly that there’s a new movement to recognize that we have to serve the communities, that’s about keeping the balance between profitability and social consciousness.”

Case Study: Roti Mediterranean Grill

As part of the Socially Conscious Consumer session at Technomic’s Consumer Trends & Directions conference, Peter Nolan, chief brand officer of Roti Mediterranean Grill, an emerging fast-casual chain based in Chicago, spoke about how Roti makes social responsibility part of its brand positioning.

In the old days, Nolan said, healthy eating and socially responsible practices “didn’t work,” but now consumers—particularly younger generations—want to live in sync with their values. He argued that “real” trumps “wow.” Authenticity, transparency and trust are important, Nolan said. Initiatives must be true to the brand’s identity and the values of its executives and employees; socially responsible practices based on marketing research will come off as false. Roti—whose motto is “Food that loves you back”—chooses initiatives that are relevant to its healthy menu, such as in-restaurant cooking classes for low-income kids. Burger restaurant Meatheads, in contrast, supports high school football.

Nolan suggested that packaging is a great way to start. Roti replaced its disposable plates with compostable plates made from sugarcane fiber. Roti composts food waste and lets customers know it donates food to a food bank.

Today’s consumers associate fresh, organic, local and sustainable foods with quality. Nolan noted that smaller companies may believe their distributor wouldn’t supply these ingredients, but if a number of customers ask, the distributor may find a way to accommodate requests.

Finally, he suggested that companies make it a mission and get the word out. Patrons want to get personally involved in charitable activities. For example, if a restaurant is raising money for literacy, it can promote the initiative as giving customers a chance to teach people to read. Restaurants can promote their initiatives via integration with customer loyalty programs, email messages, social media, and even simple in-store signage.

Key Takeaways

Social responsibility can be multifaceted. Environmentally friendly sourcing, a community presence and other aspects may be important to different consumers when they are deciding which restaurant to visit. Consumers respond to and perceive value in social responsibility. A restaurant that’s seen as socially responsible has the opportunity to increase price thresholds as well as traffic.

Marketing opportunities are expanding. Restaurants should leverage the positive vocabulary of social responsibility, communicate their values and programs to their customers, and pursue long-term consumer engagement with social issues, rather than seeing them as mere promotional opportunities.