Spice up Sliders with Non-Burger Options

May 10, 2016

SS-CrabCakeSlidersSmall

by: Marzetti Foodservice
http://blog.marzettifoodservice.com/spice-up-sliders-with-non-burger-options/

Customers continue to crave sliders, those mini sensations that pair well with warm weather and cold beverages. The opening of seating on patios and sidewalks always signals an uptick in orders for these shareable snacks. Sliders are the ultimate treat for customers who want “just a bite” of something at happy hour or snack time. They’re a popular option for grazing-prone millennials, who often choose “snack like” items over larger entrées. Operators love the versatility of sliders, since they represent a single menu item that can be used as a hors d’oeuvre, appetizer or entrée.

The Slider Evolution

“Sliders are part of the increased trend for personalization, customization and miniaturization that we see throughout the industry,” says Darren Tristano, president of Technomic, a food industry research and consultancy. “Sliders are going through their own evolution now, and chefs are moving beyond the basic burger, using the soft bun as a carrier for different proteins like pulled pork, chicken or salmon.”

Tristano says the highly customizable format allows operators to demonstrate their culinary credibility. “Because consumers are ordering a smaller portion, they’re usually willing to be more adventurous, or to order a combo plate of a few different types of sliders, one of which can be a more creative stretch for the kitchen.”

Sliders on the Menu

There are endless options for what goes inside a signature slider. Beef ‘O’ Brady’s Family Sports Pub serves Southern Fried Chicken Sliders with smoked Gouda cheese and honey mustard aioli. Del Frisco’s Grille’s Asian Street Bao Sliders include barbecue pork, pickled daikon and carrot, cucumber, cilantro and chiles. And Bar Louie offers Blackened Salmon Sliders with bacon, spinach, tomato and pesto mayonnaise.


Hard Pass on Alcohol and Fast Food Combinations

September 2, 2015

Rachael Andersen
(c) Copyright 2015, Argus Leader. All Rights Reserved.
http://www.argusleader.com/story/blogs/beerblog/2015/08/26/hard-pass-alcohol-and-fast-food-combinations/32392715/

I generally try to keep a pretty open mind, and overall I am tolerant of some pretty strange ideas … even if I don’t agree with all of them.

There are a few things, however, that I just can’t completely wrap my brain around.

Take fast food, for example. It makes total sense to me. You’re in a hurry. You’re starving, and you need to grab a quick bite. Find the nearest drive-through, and your problems are no more.

Now, consider a beer menu at a restaurant. I not only understand this, I condone it. There is nothing more relaxing than enjoying a beverage at dinner while in good company.

But when you combine those two concepts, you end up with a (somewhat) new trend that I’m just not sure if I can get behind: beer (and other alcohol) offerings at fast food restaurants.

For the past five years or so, well-known fast food giants have begun offering alcoholic beverages at select locations. Favorites such as Burger King, Sonic, Qdoba, Chipotle, White Castle, and others offer choices of bottled beer and wine, and in some instances, mixed liquor drinks. Even Starbucks is in on the trend, offering an “evening menu,” which includes beer, wine and appetizer options.

Most recently, Taco Bell has started marketing beer, wine and frozen cocktails. “Just put yourself in the mind of the young male customer,” said Darren Tristano, executive vice president at Technomic. “He might want to have a chalupa. But he’s with a female, who says, ‘I really don’t want to have Mexican, but I’d love a glass of wine.’ You’ve eliminated the veto vote by providing what is likely going to be a nicely priced wine.”

I may be an anomaly, but when I want a glass of wine, I don’t typically imagine myself enjoying it in a teal-and-purple plastic swivel chair at a table smeared with nacho cheese and old lettuce shreds. This is not to say I’m not a fan of Taco Bell and its undeniable charm, but there is a time and place for everything.

Additionally, I consider most fast food restaurants to be family-friendly. Beer can certainly be present in these types of environments, but there will inevitably be people who abuse the offerings. I definitely wouldn’t want to bring children around these situations.

One must also consider the fast-paced, “grab-and-go” nature of fast food restaurants. Obviously, these fast food chains are not offering beer for sale in their drive-throughs. But consider this: When was the last time that you sat down to eat at a fast food restaurant and stayed longer than about half an hour? If I drink a beer, I like to give myself time to enjoy it and let it digest a bit before I leave a restaurant. I have to wonder if the fast-paced environment of these restaurants may lead people to down a drink and hit the road.

I’m all for restaurants expanding their business and trying new things. And I undoubtedly enjoy seeing beer selections at various eateries. But I’m just not sure I can get behind the idea of beer at fast food restaurants. When I think of a bar, I think of beer. When I think of Starbucks, I think of coffee. When I think of Taco Bell, I think of guiltily delicious faux Mexican. I’m just not sure that the trouble of attaining a liquor license is worth it for these fast food chains.

Although Sioux Falls has yet to see much of this trend, if it’s successful in bigger metropolis areas, I don’t think we’re too far behind. Maybe by the time wine is offered at my favorite Starbucks, I’ll be more open to the idea. But for now, when the cashier at Burger King asks if I’d like a beer with that, I’ll reply, “Nah — I’ll stick to fries.”