Spice up Sliders with Non-Burger Options

May 10, 2016

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by: Marzetti Foodservice
http://blog.marzettifoodservice.com/spice-up-sliders-with-non-burger-options/

Customers continue to crave sliders, those mini sensations that pair well with warm weather and cold beverages. The opening of seating on patios and sidewalks always signals an uptick in orders for these shareable snacks. Sliders are the ultimate treat for customers who want “just a bite” of something at happy hour or snack time. They’re a popular option for grazing-prone millennials, who often choose “snack like” items over larger entrées. Operators love the versatility of sliders, since they represent a single menu item that can be used as a hors d’oeuvre, appetizer or entrée.

The Slider Evolution

“Sliders are part of the increased trend for personalization, customization and miniaturization that we see throughout the industry,” says Darren Tristano, president of Technomic, a food industry research and consultancy. “Sliders are going through their own evolution now, and chefs are moving beyond the basic burger, using the soft bun as a carrier for different proteins like pulled pork, chicken or salmon.”

Tristano says the highly customizable format allows operators to demonstrate their culinary credibility. “Because consumers are ordering a smaller portion, they’re usually willing to be more adventurous, or to order a combo plate of a few different types of sliders, one of which can be a more creative stretch for the kitchen.”

Sliders on the Menu

There are endless options for what goes inside a signature slider. Beef ‘O’ Brady’s Family Sports Pub serves Southern Fried Chicken Sliders with smoked Gouda cheese and honey mustard aioli. Del Frisco’s Grille’s Asian Street Bao Sliders include barbecue pork, pickled daikon and carrot, cucumber, cilantro and chiles. And Bar Louie offers Blackened Salmon Sliders with bacon, spinach, tomato and pesto mayonnaise.


McDonald’s All-Day Breakfast Sparks a Fast Food Fight

May 9, 2016

by Leslie Patton

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-05-03/mcdonald-s-breakfast-push-sets-off-morning-scramble-in-fast-food

Fast-food joints aren’t hitting the snooze button anymore.

McDonald’s Corp.’s decision to start selling Egg McMuffins all day long last year — meant to help sales during lunch and dinner time — has boosted its morning business as well. That, in turn, has kicked off a scramble among its rivals to find new ways to combine eggs, potatoes and meat for a tasty breakfast.

The latest example is Burger King’s Egg-Normous breakfast burrito, which is being introduced in the U.S. on Tuesday. It’s stuffed with sausage, bacon, eggs, hash browns, cheddar and American cheese and served with picante sauce. The home of the Whopper, which still serves breakfast only during morning hours, also recently added a supreme breakfast hoagie and got rid of slower-selling English muffin sandwiches.

“We’ve invested more in breakfast,” Alex Macedo, head of Burger King North America, said in an interview. “The environment is very competitive.”

Along with adding and deleting items, Burger King tweaked its smaller egg burrito earlier this year, removing green and red peppers and replacing them with hash browns.

Skillet Bowls

Taco Bell revised its morning offerings in March to include $1 options such as skillet bowls and sausage flatbread quesadillas. Subway Restaurants just announced buy-one-get-one subs for the month of May. The catch: They have to be purchased before 9 a.m. And Dunkin’ Donuts revamped its menu boards to focus on all-day choices and started advertising $1.99 Coolatta drinks that are sold at all hours.

The changes come as more U.S. consumers grab eggs and coffee outside the home, according to a study by researcher GfK MRI published by EMarketer.com. Last year, more than 34 percent of Americans reported buying breakfast at fast-food restaurants, an increase from 32.8 percent in 2011. Meanwhile, fewer consumers said they’re dining out for lunch and snacks. Dinner increased less than 1 percent.

McDonald’s all-day breakfast in the U.S. has helped turn around its worst sales slump in more than a decade by drawing more customers throughout the day, including the morning. The plan is surpassing its goals.

Exceeding Expectations

“It’s still exceeding our expectations,” Chief Executive Officer Steve Easterbrook said on a conference call in April. “Whilst we clearly added incremental visits and incremental spend across rest of day, our breakfast business has also prospered.”

Items like Egg McMuffins and hash browns fueled a 5.4 percent U.S. same-store sales increase at McDonald’s in the first quarter. That’s stronger than the most recent quarterly gains posted by Burger King, Dunkin’ and Taco Bell.

“It’s helped drive success, which they haven’t seen for several years,” said Darren Tristano, president of industry researcher Technomic Inc.

After losing customers to McDonald’s all-day Egg McMuffins, Jack in the Box Inc. has been advertising a triple-cheese and hash-brown breakfast burrito. Same-store sales at company-owned Jack in the Box locations may be down as much as 3 percent in the recently ended quarter, the company said in Februar-1x-1y. The chain also is adjusting and improving other breakfast items, CEO Lenny Comma said during a conference in March.

Dunkin’ Donuts said last month that its new menu boards are helping drive breakfast-sandwich sales. It’s also focused on introducing mobile ordering and will start a 1,650-store test in metro New York in May to get customers their morning meals even faster. CEO Nigel Travis says McDonald’s push has actually helped Dunkin’ in the breakfast battle by highlighting that the doughnut chain has the same menu all day. Still, the change has increased competition for diners’ dollars.

“Clearly, the value war is pretty intense,” Travis said in an interview.