Burger King Debuts Low-Calorie French Fries

October 11, 2013

n-BURGER-largeLooking for an edge against its quick-serve rivals, Burger King is introducing healthier french fries, dubbed “Satisfries,” today at all of its 7,200 U.S. outlets.

Satisfries contain 40 percent less fat and 30 percent fewer calories than traditional fries, and 25 percent less fat and 20 percent fewer calories than standard Burger King fries, which remain on the menu. Satisfries will sell for $1.79–$1.99 a serving, compared with the $1.59 price of basic fries.

Eric Hirschhorn, chief marketing officer, North America, at Miami-based Burger King, says fries are the one quick-serve category that hasn’t seen “breakthrough innovation.”

“We’re not replacing our current french fries. We’re just giving [customers] a new option,” Hirschhorn says. “We’re giving people an option to make small changes.”

Hirschhorn says consumers’ evolving tastes and dietary choices encouraged Burger King to develop Satisfries. He adds that french fry consumption is declining, even though about half of the 100 million consumers who stop at a Burger King each month order fries.

“People want to make small changes that make a big impact, and don’t want to sacrifice the foods they love,” Hirschhorn says.

Keri Gans, Burger King spokeswoman, registered dietician, and author of The Small Change Diet, said during a September 19 product launch in New York City that one in eight men and one in 10 women in the U.S. dine on french fries daily, and that fries constitute 1.5 percent of the caloric intake of the average American meal. Satisfries contain the same ingredients as the classic fries, just in smaller quantities, she added.

The healthier fries will initially be a limited-time offering. Hirschhorn says the public’s reaction will determine how long the item stays on the menu. Its debut will be supported by a full marketing campaign.

Burger King could use a winner. Competition from McDonald’s and Wendy’s value menus, as well as from a growing crop of fast-casual concepts, has slowed the company’s growth. In fact, same-stores sales at Burger King dipped 3 percent in the U.S. and Canada during the first quarter of 2013 compared with the previous year.

“Economic factors are influencing low-income groups’ ability to dine out with greater frequency, making it more difficult for fast-food chains to increase traffic and sales,” says Darren Tristano, EVP at Technomic, a Chicago-based market research firm.

To keep pace with McDonald’s and Wendy’s, Tristano says, Burger King must introduce new products to keep the cash registers ringing. In the last year, it has added a barbecue sandwich, sweet potato fries, smoothies, and lemonades, helping it compete against industry leaders, he adds.


Olive Garden Woos Millennials with Smaller Portions

October 10, 2013

Olive Garden, purveyor of the Never Ending Pasta Bowl, has discovered portion control.

In an effort to attract millennials and boost flagging sales, Darden Restaurants Inc.’s Italian restaurant chain is introducing small plates, including Parmesan asparagus and grilled-chicken tapas. This amounts to a 180 degree turn for a chain that has long sold big portions to eaters who like a deal.

The challenge for Olive Garden will be encouraging diners in their 20s and 30s, many of whom shun chain restaurants, to drop by for nibbles without alienating loyal customers who convene for regular family feasts.

For millennials, “social occasions generally don’t tend to be large meals in a traditional sense,” said Darren Tristano, executive vice president at Technomic Inc., a Chicago-based research firm. “They’re looking for items they can share, sample, that allow them to graze.”

Small plates may not be “a clean fit” for Olive Garden, given its focus on families and boomers, he said.

Olive Garden created the tapas recipes about six months ago and began testing the food earlier this year in cities including Atlanta, Los Angeles and Grand Rapids, Mich.

After offering the dishes for a limited time last month, the chain plans to add them to the permanent menu in December. It’s also trying out more small plate varieties such as garlic hummus, chicken meatballs and tortelloni stuffed with cheese, to gauge customer response before introducing them nationwide.

Olive Garden has been struggling in the aftermath of the downturn as Americans eat out less. Efforts to lure cash- strapped diners with such deals as three-course dinners and $6.95 lunches haven’t helped much because Brinker International Inc.’s Chili’s and Applebee’s, owned by DineEquity Inc., are also advertising cheap eats.

As a category, sit-down restaurants are lagging behind fast food and fast casual joints. Sales at full-service restaurants will rise 2.9 percent this year to $208.1 billion, compared with a 4.9 percent gain for fast-food eateries, according to National Restaurant Association estimates.

Same-store sales at Olive Garden, which has about 820 locations, have declined in five of the last eight quarters. Darden, which also owns Red Lobster and LongHorn Steakhouse, recently announced it is “significantly” cutting Olive Garden store openings to focus on attracting new customers.

“It’s wise to slow down that growth a little bit,” said Stephen Anderson, an analyst at Miller Tabak & Co. in New York. “They’re getting very close to that saturation point in the U.S.,” which would be between 900 and 1,000 stores, he said.

The company is reworking the recipe for its crispy chickpeas after the seasoning and breading didn’t resonate with diners in testing. It also increased the size of its grilled chicken tapas from one to two skewers of meat after customers said the portion was too small to share.

“If you only have one, people are fighting,” said Jay Spenchian, executive vice president of marketing.

The small plates, priced at $4, are “expanding the way people think about Olive Garden,” he said. “The reaction has been excellent.”

While some customers grab a quick glass of wine and a small plate, others eat them as appetizers to a larger meal or to sample something they’ve never tasted before, he said.

Olive Garden has plenty of competition in the race to win over millennials. Applebee’s has introduced late-night specials such as half-price appetizers and girls’ night out to attract younger customers. Its Club Bee’s locations stay open until 2 a.m. and sell sangria and bahama mamas to the party crowd.

Outback Steakhouse, owned by Bloomin’ Brands Inc., recently sold a $10.99 steak-tasting option with two or three pieces of beef with different sauces including brandy peppercorn and Bearnaise. Cheesecake Factory Inc. has small plates including chicken samosas and fried zucchini.

More millennials are dropping by the Olive Garden in Irving, Texas, to sample the small plates, Alex Aragon, the restaurant’s general manager, said in an interview.

The tapas are “closing the gap between lunch and dinner,” said Aragon, who noted that it’s easier for the younger crowd to text and check their phones while munching hand-held bites.


Chipotle, Panera Bread Copycats Turn Up the Heat

October 10, 2013

The success of fast-casual leaders Chipotle Mexican Grill (CMG) and Panera Bread (PNRA) have attracted their share of imitators.

Fast-food giant Yum Brands’ (YUM) KFC is among the latest and biggest names in the restaurant industry to throw its hat into the fast-growing fast-casual ring.

KFC is testing a fast-casual format that makes no bones about borrowing Chipotle’s business model, in which customers choose ingredients for staffers to assemble as they walk the food line.

The test restaurant near the chain’s headquarters in Louisville is called KFC eleven. It’s been “well received,” said spokesman Rick Maynard in an e-mail. He says KFC will open a second location in the area.

“The focus is on learning everything we can at this innovation restaurant and using it to benefit the KFC brand,” he said.

The interior features dark woods and stainless steel. The logo has a rooster instead of KFC’s rendering of the white-bearded Colonel Sanders. But the “eleven” in the name pays tribute to the founder for the 11 herbs and spices used in his original recipe for fried chicken.

The menu of salads and rice bowls is built around KFC’s relatively new boneless chicken product, which have received lots of TV air time this year from “I ate the bones” commercials.

KFC eleven is the company’s attempt to “remain relevant, evolve and raise the quality for a more affluent customer,” said Darren Tristano, executive vice president of Technomic, a foodservice research firm. “The plan is to roll it out. But they need to be sure it’s working (operationally).”

Meanwhile, Starbucks (SBUX) has moved deeper into Panera territory. It’s been offering new bakery products from its acquisition last year of La Boulange Café & Bakery, a Bay area fast-casual chain. New salad bowls and sandwiches also have been rolled out recently.

“They definitely intend to be more competitive with Panera,” as well as with McDonald’s (MCD) during breakfast, Tristano said.

KFC’s sister brand Taco Bell also has been experimenting with fast-casual foods with a “Cantina Bell” menu within its existing fast-food units. Meant to compete with Chipotle but with lower prices, the menu features cilantro rice-stuffed burritos and bowls with fresh-Mex ingredients such as corn salsa, black beans and romaine lettuce.

“It’s for Millenials who desire the ‘farm to table’ feel,” said analyst Conrad Lyon of B. Riley. “It takes the freshness factor up a notch.”

The ultimate imitator of fast-casual concepts and Chipotle in particular may be Chipotle itself. It’s applying its assembly-line approach of fresh-Mex items to a spin-off called ShopHouse Asian Kitchen, inspired by the popular one-dish shop houses of Thailand.

Three restaurants are currently open, two in Washington, D.C., and one in Hollywood, with a fourth soon to open in Santa Monica, Calif.’s Third Street Promenade.

Four others in the D.C. and L.A. markets are expected to open by mid-2014, for a total of eight.

Chipotle, Starbucks and Yum Brands shares all fell less than 1% in afternoon trading in the stock market today. Panera is down nearly 2%.


Starbucks Sets its Sights on Panera

October 9, 2013

StarbucksLogowithspaceatbottom 304The success of fast-casual chains such as Panera Bread Co. and Chipotle Mexican Grill is causing competitors ranging from Starbucks to KFC and Taco Bell to look for ways to copycat their results.

With its latest menu additions, Starbucks has been moving deeper into Panera’s territory, Investor’s Business Daily reports.

Starbucks added new bakery products to its offerings following its acquisition of the La Boulange Cafe & Bakery fast-casual chain, and now the company is rolling out salad bowls and sandwiches at its coffee shops.

“They definitely intend to be more competitive with Panera,” Darren Tristano, executive vice president of foodservice research firm Technomic, told IBD.

Panera Bread Co. reported fiscal second-quarter net income of $51 million, up 15.6 percent from last year’s quarter. The company’s total revenue for the fiscal second quarter ended June 25 rose to $589 million, up 11 percent from the second quarter of fiscal 2012.


Family Restaurants a Casualty to Casual

October 8, 2013

Gene_Kasapis_Sr_and_Gene_Jr.jpg&MaxW=620&v=201310071326When Gene Kasapis Sr. opened the first Ram’s Horn restaurant in 1967 in Greektown, family dining was one of the largest segments of the restaurant industry.

Since reaching an apex six years ago, sales at Southfield-based Kasapis Bros. Inc. have been declining, falling from $44.8 million in 2007 to $35.6 million in 2011.

But Kasapis Sr. and his son Gene Kasapis Jr. are hoping a modern restaurant design and an updated menu will become prototypes for change as the once-thriving restaurant chain looks to regain its popularity.

Like many family restaurants, Ram’s Horn has battled increased competition from fast-casual chains, burger joints and sandwich shops — even family-friendly taverns.

The elder Kasapis said sales are slowly getting better, but he also attributed local economic conditions as an added challenge.

“Are we picking up? Yeah. But are we anywhere near we were in 2007? No,” Kasapis said. “Every recession, we come back stronger than before. In our 50-year history, this is the longest recession.”

Kasapis said he has a simple solution for the declining sales: “More people need to get back to work.”

There are 19 Ram’s Horn restaurants, seven of which are corporately owned.

While Kasapis Sr. said he has no plans to begin selling alcohol at any of his Ram’s Horn locations, the chain is fighting back with new menu items and a new décor for its locations in Livonia and Dearborn.

The new layout features open ceilings, new carpet, new lighting and flat-screen TVs.

Kasapis said the new design costs between $300,000 and $550,000 per location, adding that the company will retrofit existing restaurants with the new décor as needed but is in no hurry to do so.

“We are trying to make our restaurants more appealing to younger people,” Kasapis Jr. said. “We have to change with the times.”

Conversely, Joe Vicari, president and CEO of Warren-based Joe Vicari Restaurant Group, which includes four Country Inn restaurants, said he saw a 10 percent spike in sales during the height of the recession at his Country Inn restaurants, but it was short-lived.

“That has since settled,” Vicari said. “Sales from this year over last year have been flat.”

Vicari said average weekly sales at the family restaurants range from $30,000 to $35,000, about the same as when he opened his first Country Inn in 1987.

“When you take into consideration increased operating costs, we should be doing $40,000 or more in sales per week,” he said.

Vicari was once a Ram’s Horn franchisee and owned two restaurants, but said he ended his relationship with the brand in 1997.

“It was good to get involved with Ram’s Horn when they were at their peak,” he said. “I learned a lot about the restaurant business from them, but as I got older and wiser, I wanted to go out on my own.”

Darren Tristano, executive vice president of Chicago-based food industry research firm Technomic Inc., says there is more to deflated family restaurant sales than a stubborn economy.

In fact, Tristano said, sales are declining across the board in the family-style restaurant segment of the industry.

The main culprit, he said, is the emergence of fast-casual restaurants and changing consumer tastes.

“Family dining has been flat for a decade,” Tristano said. “Casual dining, and fast casual dining, hit a growth spurt in 2005 and that momentum has continued.”

Tristano said the fast-casual segment will generate about $35 billion this year while family-style dining will generate about $40 billion.

But Tristano said those numbers can be deceiving.

“Fast casual has been a small segment that is quickly growing, while family-style dining has, on a nominal basis, been flat,” Tristano said. “In fact, when adjusted for inflation, family dining has been down.”

Tristano said family dining peaked in the 1990s, before fast-casual restaurants like St. Louis-based Panera Bread Co. and Denver-based Chipotle Mexican Grill Inc. entered the marketplace, which proved more attractive to younger diners.

“What family dining is facing is, you have older generations continuing to age and younger ones that feel too young to go to them,” Tristano said. “There has to be a shift in the category to get relevant to younger consumers. So far, that has not happened.”

Jason Nies, owner of The Hills City Grille, grew up around the Ram’s Horn brand; his father was a franchisee.

Nies said he saw the decline in family dining and decided to stay away from the segment when he began planning the first Hills City Grille, in Rochester Hills.

“I saw that trend going down 10 years ago,” Nies said. “The clientele was getting older and moving on, so I felt like it was a segment that was on the decline versus one on the rise.”

Nies opened the first Hills City Grille in 2007 as more of a tavern than a family restaurant.

But when he opened a second location, in a former Ram’s Horn in Troy, he did so with family diners in mind.

Troy’s Hills City Grille is a hybrid; it serves breakfast, lunch and dinner but each part of the day is geared toward a different segment of the population.

Nies said breakfast attracts older guests, while lunch fills up with stay-at-home moms and business professionals.

Nies said the strongest part of the day is dinner, when young parents with children make up more than 60 percent of his customer base.

After 10 p.m., Hills City Grille turns into a bar complete with live music and craft drink specials.

“Where are families going? They are going to the taverns and places with similar atmospheres. Places that serve beer and wine with dinner,” Nies said.

Nies said he expects sales at the restaurant to reach $1.5 million this year.

“It’s pretty unique to be able to hit all of the dayparts effectively and have a venue that permits that,” he said.


Friendly’s Puts on its Sundae Best

October 1, 2013

0927_ExecPro-Maguire, John2 304As a Weymouth native, John Maguire spent a lot of time at Wilbraham-based Friendly’s restaurants while growing up.

“It’s where I hung out with pals,” Maguire said. “There are so many great memories of the brand. It’s an institution.”

Now a little over a year into his tenure as CEO of Friendly’s, Maguire has been tasked with bringing the chain back to its once-iconic status. Friendly’s has had a tough go of it in the 21st century. About 100 restaurants have been shuttered since the company filed for bankruptcy in October 2011, and the chain now has 380 locations. A 2012 Consumer Reports survey showed Friendly’s received poor marks in cleanliness and customer service.

But the company’s emergence from bankruptcy in early 2012 presented it with an opportunity for a new start. And as part of that reboot, Maguire was brought on to lead the chain in April that year. Maguire, 47, left his post as chief operating officer at Panera Bread for the opportunity. He had been with Panera for 19 years — and his experience there has informed his early days in the effort to turn Friendly’s around.

“I wasn’t planning on leaving Panera,” Maguire said. “What intrigued me about Friendly’s was that I watched it decline firsthand. … I asked myself, ‘Should Friendly’s continue to exist?’ I started doing research on the brand … and decided there’s no reason it shouldn’t exist.”

Panera spent the 2000s moving in the opposite direction of Friendly’s. Its growth — the chain now boasts more than 1,600 restaurants and has added 500 since the financial crisis — can largely be attributed to Maguire, Panera executive vice chairman Bill Moreton said. “John has a core understanding of both customers and employees,” Moreston said. “He knows that the best way to serve a customer’s needs is by helping associates understand what associates do.”

That appears to be Maguire’s modus operandi at Friendly’s. The company’s top current initiative, he said, is to improve customer service, in part with a new employee training program. “We’ve hired people in the past who haven’t been so friendly,” Maguire said. “We set a higher standard than most brands (for service) with the name on our sign.”

Before Panera, Maguire worked for Wonderbread and Bread & Circus supermarkets. Those manufacturing and retail experiences have also informed his early days at Friendly’s, whose retail ice cream products have thrived while the restaurants have declined. Friendly’s ice cream is now sold in more than 8,000 grocery stores nationwide and has seen a 20 percent year-over-year sales increase in the last two years, Maguire said.

Maguire said 70 percent of Friendly’s customers order dessert, compared to just 6 percent at restaurants nationwide. “You’ve got to make sure people clearly understand what differentiates us,” he said.

Meanwhile, the company has brought more focus to the rest of its menu. Since joining the company, Friendly’s has dropped several items, such as quesadillas, steak tips and stir fry. Instead, the chain is working to improve on the quality of its classic offerings. For instance, it has begun making the Fishamajig with haddock rather than pollock.

Friendly’s is also remodeling its restaurants as part of the effort to address past complaints about cleanliness. The company has remodeled 40 of its restaurants, will remodel 10 more before the end of the year, and will eventually bring a facelift to all of its locations nationwide.

Restaurant consultancy Technomic said consumers have approved of the changes so far. Customer satisfaction at Friendly’s spiked in the fourth quarter of 2012, though it has tempered since. Technomic analyst Darren Tristano compared the Friendly’s comeback attempt to Little Caesars’. In the early 2000s, the pizza chain began expanding again after introducing higher quality ingredients and remodeling its restaurants.

Maguire said total revenue at Friendly’s grew in 2012 and is projected to grow again in 2013. Meanwhile, Maguire said, there are plans to open at least two new restaurants in Eastern Massachusetts — the company’s strongest market — in 2014.


Industry Evolution

October 1, 2013

U.S. restaurant chains of all stripes are taking on fast-casual attributes to evolve their concepts and remain relevant to consumers.

Change is one of the few constants in the restaurant industry. Whether restaurants are adding another daypart, updating the décor or introducing new prototypes, the best foodservice operators understand that, to succeed in the business, they should be aware of the unpredictability of the industry and be open to evolving.

In the past few years, we’ve seen many U.S. concepts make some key changes to keep up with the restaurant industry’s best performer: the fast-casual segment. Thanks to customisable and craveable options, premium ingredients and quick service, growth of the fast-casual segment is outpacing that of the quick-service and full-service sectors. As reported in Technomic’s Top 500 Chain Restaurant Report, turnover for the restaurant industry as a whole from 2011 to 2012 increased 5.2%, including a 5.8% rise in limited-service turnover and a 4.5% increase in full-service turnover. In comparison, turnover for the fast-casual segment increased 13.0% from 2011 to 2012, and that growth is expected to continue.

To compete with fast-casual restaurants, quick-service and casual-dining operators are branching out of their comfort zones to find different ways to reach new consumers as well as retain their customer base. Full-service chains such as Applebee’s and Red Lobster have introduced fast-casual elements to attract on-the-go consumers, and Burger King, which receives most of its business from drive-thru and carryout orders, added delivery service to increase its convenience factor. Other chains like Auntie Anne’s and Chick-fil-A are using food trucks to generate brand awareness by bringing their food to festivals, sporting events and community gatherings.

It’s not just existing chains that understand the need to evolve. The latest crop of limited-service pizza concepts, which includes Pie Five Pizza Co. and MOD Pizza, functions more like a Chipotle than a Pizza Hut. Patrons create their pizzas by making their way through an assembly line-style queue, choosing a crust, sauce, cheese and toppings as they go. They then receive their pizzas in minutes, sometimes by the time they reach the cash register. This style of ordering allows diners to be much more involved in the pizza-making process than at a traditional limited-service pizza concept, where patrons usually don’t watch the preparation of their pizzas. The customisability and quick service are some of the reasons why Technomic predicts made-to-order fast-casual pizza concepts are the next “better burger.”

Below are some examples of operators thinking outside of the box in order to keep their concept relevant in the ever-changing restaurant industry.

Full Service to Limited Service

In the U.S., the limited-service sector is growing at a faster rate than the full-service segment, leading some of the country’s top full-service chains to experiment with limited-service prototypes. In August, midscale chain Bob Evans launched Bob Evans Express, a new counter-service prototype for nontraditional venues such as corporate offices, universities and shopping malls. The new format, which offers a limited menu of hot foods along with packaged items, was designed to expose patrons who otherwise wouldn’t have the time to visit a sit-down Bob Evans restaurant to the chain’s signature homestyle breakfast and lunch offerings.

Earlier this year, U.S. casual-dining seafood chain Red Lobster began testing a new limited-service offering, Seaside Express, at two of its Florida locations. Patrons visiting the restaurants can choose either the standard full-service Red Lobster dining experience or order from the Seaside Express counter, which offers a menu of mains such as burgers, sandwiches and flatbreads, priced between $6.99 and $8.99 (approximately £4.50 and £5.79). After ordering, customers seat themselves and a server brings out their food. Because patrons pay for their meals at the counter, the concept is meant to appeal to diners who are pressed for time and may not like waiting for a cheque to be brought to the table. It also appeals to those looking for a discounted Red Lobster experience—the Seaside Express menu features lower-priced mains compared to Red Lobster’s standard menu.

Also earlier this year, Applebee’s expanded its limited-service model, Applebee’s Express Lunch, to 23 company-owned locations in the U.S. The format, first launched in Kansas City in July 2012, is similar to Seaside Express, in that patrons choose to either sit down and be waited on or order their meal from the Express counter, then seat themselves. The menu features pick-two combos starting at $6.99.

Applebee’s launched a fast-casual offering, Applebee’s Lunch Express. Patrons order at a counter then seat themselves, and a server brings their food to their table.

Applebee’s launched a fast-casual offering, Applebee’s Lunch Express. Patrons order at a counter then seat themselves, and a server brings their food to their table.

The Un-Delivered Pizza

Today’s trendiest limited-service pizza concepts don’t focus on delivery—in fact, most don’t even offer it. Fast-casual pizza concepts such as Uncle Maddio’s Pizza Joint and Blaze Fast Fire’d Pizza are revolutionizing the limited-service pizza industry by specializing in create-your-own personal pizzas. Thanks to high-tech pizza ovens that cook pies at incredibly high temperatures, patrons no longer have to call ahead to place a takeaway order or sit at their house waiting for a pizza to be delivered. Now, customers can simply line up at a counter, choose their crust, sauce and premium toppings, and either have their pizzas ready for them by the time they reach the cash register or brought to their table by a server in minutes.

One of the largest points of differentiation is that these fast-casual pizza concepts focus on dine-in service. Instead of operating out of small, minimally decorated counter units, these restaurants feature a hip, chic décor and plenty of seating to attract dine-in consumers. Most also menu adult beverages, a characteristic that attracts value-seeking consumers on a dinner date or group outing who may not have the funds to visit a full-service restaurant and provide a tip.

Décor at Uncle Maddio’s Pizza Joint units (top) includes abstract wall dividers and a word wall, dominated by the phrase “Served with love.” Pie Five Pizza Co. units feature science-themed murals, such as a periodic table that replaces the elements with Pie Five pizza ingredients.

Décor at Uncle Maddio’s Pizza Joint units (top) includes abstract wall dividers and a word wall, dominated by the phrase “Served with love.” Pie Five Pizza Co. units feature science-themed murals, such as a periodic table that replaces the elements with Pie Five pizza ingredients.

These new concepts haven’t gone unnoticed by the quick-service pizza sector. Pizza Inn, a U.S. pizza chain that consists mostly of buffet and counter-service restaurants, launched its own fast-casual made-to-order pizza concept, Pie Five Pizza Co., in 2011, which has since grown to 14 locations. Sbarro, another U.S. quick-service pizza chain, is set to debut a fast-casual pizza concept, Pizza Cucinova, later this year.

Not all pizza chains are launching fast-casual concepts; some are instead choosing to incorporate fast-casual elements into their existing concept. Within the past few years, Domino’s Pizza has converted dozens of restaurants into its Pizza Theater prototype. The model still functions like a typical Domino’s Pizza unit but features a comfortable dining room and an open kitchen for patrons to watch the preparation of their pizzas. Other new elements to the Pizza Theater prototype include ordering kiosks, electronic order tracking, and chalkboards where customers can doodle and leave feedback while waiting for their order.

Quick-Service Delivery

In contrast, some quick-service concepts are updating their concepts by adding delivery services. In 2012, Burger King launched delivery in the U.S. at select locations in Washington, DC, and has since expanded the service to select markets in 14 states, from California to Illinois to New York. The chain boasts that hot food is delivered hot and cold food is delivered cold, thanks to new innovative packaging. The service is designed for large orders (a minimum order amount of $10 is required), so in addition to Burger King’s standard offerings, the delivery menu also features several large combo meals, like a four-sandwich bundle with fries and an option with 10 cheeseburgers and 20 chicken nuggets.

A loyalty program specifically for customers using the delivery service has been implemented to bring in more users. Those who use the service and are enrolled in the loyalty program receive a free sandwich with every fourth order.

Burger King launched delivery service in select markets in the U.S. The delivery menu features Burger King’s traditional offerings along with large combo meals.

Burger King launched delivery service in select markets in the U.S. The delivery menu features Burger King’s traditional offerings along with large combo meals.

It will be interesting to see if the service succeeds and if other concepts will be inspired to launch delivery. Burger King says customers in the U.S. have embraced the new option, and it continues to expand delivery to other U.S. markets, most recently to Washington State and Minnesota. But so far, it appears only one other major U.S. quick-service chain, White Castle, has followed suit. The popular burger chain has been testing delivery at a restaurant in Columbus, OH, since earlier this year and recently added delivery to a second site in Columbus, but it hasn’t discussed any plans to expand the service nationwide.

Key Takeaways

While the fast-casual segment is booming in the U.S., it is relatively new in the U.K.—only seven of Technomic’s Leading 100 U.K. Chain Restaurants are classified as fast casual. However, all of those chains posted turnover increases in 2012, and three of them–Patisserie Valerie, PAUL and Le Pain Quotidien–reported double-digit turnover growth. As a group, they increased sales by 8.5% and grew their unit count by 6.6%.

With these numbers, along with the recent entry of U.S. fast-casual concepts like Shake Shack and Five Guys Burgers and Fries in the U.K., we can expect the U.K. fast-casual sector to continue growing. Thus, it’s likely we’ll see top quick-service and casual-dining chains in the U.K. evolve their concepts to compete with the growing fast-casual segment.